William Faulkner Society Newsletter, Spring 2015

Dear Faulkner Society Members,

I hope this message finds you well. I’m writing to report on the WFS business meeting held during the recent American Literature Association Conference in Boston and to deliver a few news items (see below).

The first order of business at the meeting was to announce the new officers chosen in the recent election. Yours truly will serve as president for the next three years. I’m looking forward to working with Taylor Hagood, who was elected as vice-president, and Sarah Gleeson-White and Cheryl Lester, the new at-large representatives. Many thanks to these colleagues and friends for their willingness to serve. This summer, I will draw on my experience as a former WFS secretary-treasurer to reorganize our membership records and to resolve issues with Faulkner Journal subscriptions purchased through the Society during the delay in the journal’s publication schedule. The plan is to hold a special election to fill the secretary-treasurer position by the end of the summer. David Davis continues in his role as webmaster par excellence.  

I want to take this opportunity to recognize the officers who completed their terms as of the ALA business meeting. Deborah Clarke, the immediate past president, was steady at the helm during her term. Thank you, Deb, for your strong leadership and for staying involved this summer to help out with the transition. Deborah Cohn and Doreen Fowler deserve kudos for their valuable contributions as at-large representatives. Jennie Joiner stepped in to serve as acting-secretary treasurer in late 2013—a job she managed with considerable patience and skill. Thank you, Jennie, for your hard work.

The business meeting yielded some excellent ideas for enhancing WFS benefits and fostering a stronger sense of community among members. The addition of a lifetime membership option, the establishment of an annual award for the best published essay on Faulkner, and a return to the practice of distributing a newsletter each spring and fall (rather than relying solely on the website) were among the suggestions the officers will take into consideration as we move forward. The meeting also generated this lineup of prospective topics for future sessions at the ALA and MLA conventions:

--Faulkner’s temporalities
--Faulkner and social class
--Faulkner’s treatment of poverty
--Children/youth culture in Faulkner
--Bioethics in Faulkner
--Performing Faulkner
--Surveillance/the gaze in Faulkner
--Faulkner and sustainability
--Theorizing Faulkner
--Faulkner and cotton
--New approaches to a single novel frequently read/taught (The Sound and the Fury or As I Lay Dying in particular)

If you would like to add to this list, please let me know by sending an individual reply to this email rather a response to all recipients.

I’m looking forward to the work ahead. On behalf of the officers, I want to thank you for supporting the William Faulkner Society.

Regards,

Ted Atkinson, President

WFS NEWS DIGEST

Faulkner Society Sessions at ALA 2015
The William Faulkner Society organized the following sessions at the American Literature Association Conference held May 21-24 in Boston. The panels were well received, drawing a combined audience of more than thirty conference attendees.

Faulkner and the North
Chair, Deborah Clarke, Arizona State University
“Mobile Subjects in Faulkner, Larsen, and Thurman: The Journey North and the Lure of Belonging,” Cheryl Lester, University of Kansas
“On Malcolm Cowley’s Yoknapatawpha County,” Carolina Alvarado, Princeton University
“‘… and they will bleach out again’: The Influence of Canada on Faulkner’s Fiction,” William M. Teem IV, Georgia Northwestern Technical College

Faulkner and the Nineteenth Century
Chair, Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State University
“Crossing Genres and Genders: The Voice of the Dead in Dickinson and Faulkner,” Erin Penner, Asbury University
“The Colonized American Imperialist in Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop and Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!,” John Gallagher, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
“Exploring the Boundaries of Narrative: Faulkner’s Imaginary War,” Adam Jabbur, Towson University

Hunt Scholarships Awarded for Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha 2015
Amy A. Foley and Peter Miller are the recipients of the Hunt Scholarship sponsored by the William Faulkner Society. The scholarship supports graduate students who want to attend the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference held at the University of Mississippi. Foley, a doctoral student in English at the University of Rhode Island, and Miller, a doctoral student in English at the University of Virginia, will present papers at the conference. Congratulations to the 2015 Hunt Scholars and best wishes for a rewarding F&Y experience.

Elevator Repair Service Production of The Sound and the Fury
See https://elevator.org/soundandfuryplay/ for information about the stage adaptation of The Sound and the Fury, produced by the Elevator Repair Service in partnership with The Public Theater. Note that there are two scheduled panel discussions; among the featured speakers are Faulkner scholars Jay Watson, Philip Weinstein, Elizabeth Cornell, Donald Kartiganer, and John Matthews.  

Faulkner Society at MLA 2016
At the 2016 MLA Annual Convention in Austin (January 7-10), the William Faulkner Society will sponsor one session:

Posthuman Possibilities in Faulkner
Chair, Taylor Hagood, Florida International University
“Technologies of Writing and History: Pylon, Absalom, Absalom!, and Posthumanism,” Peter Lurie, University of Richmond
“Composted Humans: Faulkner’s Trilogy and ‘Jonquil Thunder,’” Candace Waid, University of California, Santa Barbara
“‘neither water nor earth’: The Yellow Pine in As I Lay Dying,” Andrew Kalaidjian, University of California, Santa Barbara

Calls for Papers
MULTIMEDIA FAULKNER: http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/62003
SAMLA 87 – South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference
November 13-15, 2015
Durham, NC

SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE CONFERENCE
The South in the North
Boston, March 10-12, 2016
http://southernlit.org/conference/

FAULKNER & YOKNAPATAWPHA 2016
“Faulkner and the Native South”
July 17-21, 2016
Announcement and Call for Papers
http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner
From his earliest stories to his late novels, William Faulkner returned repeatedly to the Native American origins and histories of his imaginary landscape, Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi. Faulkner’s fictional representations include the pre-modern tribal past, first contact with European settlers, southern systems of slavery (including native slavery), and the trauma of removal that Choctaws and Chickasaws experienced.

When Native American Studies began to achieve recognition in the 1970s, scholars began to investigate Faulkner’s fictional constructions of “Indians.” Questions of authenticity, stereotyping, local history, and cultural knowledge—questions that remain relevant—were at the forefront of these investigations. More recently, scholars in a variety of disciplines including history, literature, anthropology, and cultural studies are undertaking a “reconstruction” of the Native South, a landscape both imagined and real, regional and global. This new entwining of Native and Southern Studies has shifted the discussion in freshly productive directions: what roles does the U.S. South, and Faulkner’s work more specifically, play in the Native American imagination? What relations of influence or confluence exist between Faulkner and Native American writers? What new lines of aesthetic, thematic, or political affiliation emerge between Native Studies and Southern Studies, and how do Faulkner’s writings help illuminate, clarify, or complicate these connections? How does the concept of a “Native South” break with the bi-racial culture myth on which so much scholarship on southern literature (including Faulkner scholarship) is based? What other ideological interventions does the notion of a Native South produce and provoke, and how might these interventions reshape an understanding of Faulkner’s work? What tropes, themes, narrative techniques, plot structures, figurations of character, or genre features become newly or differently visible upon comparing Faulkner and native Southern writers? How do Native American critical frameworks open up new interpretive directions in Faulkner Studies? What can we learn from Faulkner’s work about the southern regional space and its complex relationship to native tribal identities and landscapes—or how might we take a fuller understanding of this relationship back to Faulkner’s work?

We especially encourage full panel proposals for 75-minute conference sessions. Such proposals should include a one-page overview of the session topic or theme, followed by two-page abstracts for each of the panel papers to be included. We also welcome individually submitted two-page abstracts for 20-minute panel papers. Panel papers consist of approximately 2,500 words and will be considered by the conference program committee for possible expansion and inclusion in the conference volume published by the University Press of Mississippi.

Session proposals and panel paper abstracts must be submitted by January 31, 2016, preferably through e-mail attachment. All manuscripts, proposals, abstracts, and inquiries should be addressed to Jay Watson, Department of English, The University of Mississippi, P.O. Box 1848, University, MS 38677-1848. E-mail: jwatson@olemiss.edu. Decisions for all submissions will be made by March 15, 2016.

William Faulkner Society Newsletter, Fall 2013

Honorable Faulkner Society Members,

First, let me offer my profound apologies for the gap in newsletters. I’m afraid that this element of the job slipped past me. However, we have a significant amount to report on, so let me try to make amends for my lapse.

The 2013 ALA in Boston saw the rousing success of both of our panels. “Faulkner and Citizenship” attracted 25 attendees and “Faulkner: Beyond Yoknapatawpha” brought in 35. Excellent papers were followed by spirited discussion.

At the Faulkner Society Business Meeting at ALA, we discussed possible future panel topics (see below) and also our dues structure. We came to the decision that it’s time to raise our dues, which are currently the least expensive of all of the author societies—at least, that’s the impression I got at the Author Society Business Meeting. We determined to raise them from $10/year to $20/year or 3 years for $55. Student dues (graduate, undergraduate, secondary) will stay at $10/year. We’d also like to offer Lifetime Memberships. Through 2014, you can sign up for a Lifetime Membership for the bargain price of $150; after that, price will rise to $200. The primary reason for this increase is that we’ve been having difficulty funding the Hunt Scholarships, which support graduate students who want to attend the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford. These scholarships help us to recruit new Faulkner scholars, and we want to make sure that Faulkner remains at the forefront of American literary studies. It may take a little time to get the new dues structure up on the website, so I ask your patience as we make the shift.

Again, my apologies for failing to get the newsletter out. I’ll do my best to keep track of all things Faulkner and report on them next spring. Please feel free to email me announcements or items of interest you’d like to see included at Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu.

Sincerely,
Deborah Clarke, President

Upcoming Events:
We hope to see many of you at the 2014 MLA in Chicago, where we are sponsoring two panels: “Faulkner and Disability Studies” and “Faulkner and Women Writers.” The one on women writers is our guaranteed session, and we were able to get the additional session on disability studies, which has also been selected as a Presidential Theme panel, as part of the theme for this year’s MLA on vulnerability. Below is the information on the two panels. We’re very excited about both and anticipate two lively and interesting sessions.

382. Faulkner and Disability Studies
Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Los Angeles–Miami, Chicago Marriott
Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society
Presiding: Ted B. Atkinson, Mississippi State Univ.
1. "Engaging the Poetics of Disability in Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury: Benjy's Epistemological Critique of the South," Erin E. Eighan, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs
2. "Sound and the Fury as a Prosthetic Text: Faulkner, Modernism, and Disability Studies," Sandra K. Stanley, California State Univ., Northridge
3. "'Two Phlegm-Clots above Her': Prosthesis and Disability in Sanctuary," Taylor Hagood, Florida Atlantic Univ.
Responding: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park

760. Faulkner and Women Writers
Sunday, 12 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Old Town, Chicago Marriott
Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society
Presiding: Deborah L. Clarke, Arizona State Univ.

1. "'Coldly Intense Writers': William Faulkner, Djuna Barnes, and Social Margins," Kelly C. MacPhail, McGill Univ.
2. "Huntin' Bar with Marge and Will; or, William Faulkner and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Write Wilderness," John Wharton Lowe, Univ. of Georgia
3. "Faulkner and Female Narrators," Jolene Hubbs, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

Future calls for papers:
We invite you to submit proposals for ALA 2014 and MLA 2015. At ALA, we are planning three panels: Faulkner and Twain, Faulkner and Welty, Teaching Faulkner.

Call for Papers: ALA, 2014

"William Faulkner and Mark Twain"
A Joint Session sponsored by the Mark Twain Circle and the William Faulkner Society American Literature Association Conference May 22-25, 2014, Washington, D.C.

Faulkner and Twain: an often-overlooked but intriguing pairing. The William Faulkner Society and the Mark Twain Circle invite proposals for papers that bring together Faulkner and Twain in creative and thought-provoking ways. The possibilities are endless for productive dialogues, and we anticipate a fun and interesting session.Please send 250-300 word proposals to Deborah Clarke ( Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu) and to Linda Morris (lamorris@ucdavis.edu). Deadline: January 13, 2014.

“Teaching Faulkner”
A session sponsored by the William Faulkner Society
American Literature Association Conference May 22-25, 2014, Washington, D.C.

The William Faulkner Society seeks proposals for a roundtable on teaching Faulkner. We welcome any aspect of the experience of dealing with a difficult writer, but are particularly interested in how people may have integrated undergraduate research and/or digital media in the teaching of Faulkner, as well as such topics as Faulkner and the Global South. Please send 250-300 word proposals to Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu. Deadline: January 13, 2014.

"William Faulkner and Eudora Welty"
A Joint Session sponsored by the Eudora Welty Society and the William Faulkner Society American Literature Association Conference May 22-25, 2014 Washington, D.C.

When William Faulkner sent Eudora Welty a postcard in 1943 from Hollywood praising her book, The Robber Bridegroom, and offering to help her, Welty acknowledged that getting fan mail from Faulkner was "strange stuff." Welty for her part praised and defended Faulkner in interviews and print, answering the question of his influence with "it was like living near a mountain." As Noel Polk points out, however, "unspoken in her image, and perhaps even unthought, is the simple fact that what most often lives near a mountain is another mountain." We seek papers exploring or revisioning any aspect of the relations, confluences, and divergences between these two Mississippi "mountains" and/or their work.
Please send 250 word proposals to Sarah_Ford@baylor.edu and to Deborah Clarke (Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu) by December 15th, 2013.

We’re hoping to sponsor two panels for the 2015 MLA in Vancouver. Our guaranteed session will be “Faulkner and Foodways,” and we are proposing what we anticipate to be an interdisciplinary panel, “Faulkner and Education.”

Call for Papers: MLA, 2015

"Faulkner and Foodways"
A session sponsored by William Faulkner Society
Modern Literature Association Conference Jan 8-11, 2014, Vancouver, B.C.

The production, purchase, packaging and consumption of food are staples of Faulkner’s work. We seek papers that explore the relevance of foodways, defined broadly, in shaping his fictional world. What role, for example, does the food industry play in establishing a social and/or commercial space? What does food in Faulkner reveal about domesticity and the social constructions of gender and race? How does food illuminate the economic constraints of Faulkner’s South? These are just some of the questions one might consider in exploring the intersection between Faulkner and foodways. Please send 250-300 word proposals to Deborah Clarke (Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu) by March 10, 2014.

“Faulkner and Education” (non-guaranteed session)

While higher education brings little glory in Faulkner’s work—always beware of characters with PhDs—the idea of education permeates his fictional enterprise. We seek papers that investigate the role of education, and are particularly interested in those approaching it from an interdisciplinary perspective including, but not limited to, the educational system of the rural South, teacher-training, educational developments, and teachable moments in Faulkner. How does a broader angle on education open up new ways of thinking about Faulkner’s presentation of a rural southern community and how it may be shaped by the educational system? How does education—at all levels—prompt us to think about what is taught and learned (or unlearned) in Faulkner’s world? Please send 250-300 word proposals to Deborah Clarke (Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu) by March 10, 2014.

Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference
The 40th annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference, "Faulkner and the Black Literatures of the Americas," took place July 21-25 on the campus of the University of Mississippi. Keynote speakers included Kenneth Warren (University of Chicago), Thadious M. Davis (University of Pennsylvania), George Hutchinson (Cornell University), and James Smethurst (University of Massachusetts, Amherst). A record number of speakers, nearly three dozen, joined the four invited keynote speakers to place Faulkner's work in conversation with African American and Afro-Caribbean writers, including Charles Waddell Chesnutt, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Frantz Fanon, James Baldwin, Edouard Glissant, Toni Morrison, Randall Kenan, Suzan-Lori Parks, Edwidge Danticat, Edward P. Jones, Natasha Trethewey, and others. A special conference session was devoted to remembering the life and work of noted Faulkner scholar and conference stalwart Noel E. Polk. At the conference the winners of the Hunt Scholarships were recognized. They included Maia Butler (PhD student in English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette); Jenna Sciuto (PhD student in English at Northeastern University); and Carrie Helms Tippen (PhD student at Texas Christian University). All of the Hunt Scholars presented papers at the conference.

Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha, 2014
“Faulkner and History”
July 20-24, 2014
Announcement and Call For Papers
http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner

The 41st annual Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha conference will be devoted to an interdisciplinary conversation between literary scholars and historians exploring the rich relationship between history and the life and art of William Faulkner. How do specific histories—of Mississippi, of the U.S. South, of the nation, of the Americas, of the Atlantic or Pacific regions, of modernity, of technology, of private or everyday life, of the environment, of ideas and intellectual work, of the senses or affects, of underrepresented populations, groups, or societies, of colonialism and empire, of global movements, migrations, and exchanges, and so on—illuminate, challenge, complicate, or otherwise situate Faulkner’s imaginative writings and public performances? What in turn can Faulkner’s life and work contribute to a deeper understanding of such historical moments, problems, or domains? How should we understand and assess the historiographic imagination we so frequently encounter in Faulkner and his characters, the historical enterprise as practiced by such characters, the historical archives they consult or construct in pursuit of this enterprise, and the historical remains they encounter or leave behind? What can we learn from Faulkner’s experiences as a historical figure in his own right—his own participation in specific historical moments, crises, events—or from his impact on historians? What can Faulkner teach us about the links between memory, trauma, and the practices of material history, and what can that nexus of problems teach us about his work? How should we assess Faulkner’s legacy as an artistic chronicler of the Civil War and World War One, historical crises (themselves observing milestone anniversaries in 2014) that were imaginatively formative for him? What might contemporary theoretical reconceptualizations of temporality and the past contribute to the ongoing reconceptualization of Faulkner’s work, or vice versa? How and where do Faulkner and/or Faulkner scholarship shed light on the challenges and rewards of using archival materials to understand history or reframe key historical questions, especially as historical and literary archives are themselves undergoing significant transformation in the digital era? How and where else might historians and literary critics meet over Faulkner to interrogate the questions that guide and shape their disciplines today?

We especially encourage full panel proposals for 75-minute conference sessions. Such proposals should include a one-page overview of the session topic or theme, followed by two-page abstracts for each of the panel papers to be included. We also welcome individually submitted two-page abstracts for 20-minute panel papers and individually submitted manuscripts for 40-minute plenary papers. Panel papers consist of approximately 2,500 words and will be considered by the conference program committee for possible inclusion in the conference volume published by the University Press of Mississippi. Plenary papers, which should be prepared using the 16th edition of the University of Chicago Manual of Style as a guide, consist of approximately 5,000-6,000 words and will appear in the published volume.

Session proposals and panel paper abstracts must be submitted by January 31, 2014, preferably through e-mail attachment. For plenary papers, three print copies of the manuscript must be submitted by January 31, 2014. Authors whose plenary papers are selected for presentation at the conference will receive a conference registration waiver. All manuscripts, proposals, abstracts, and inquiries should be addressed to Jay Watson, Department of English, The University of Mississippi, P.O. Box 1848, University, MS 38677-1848. E-mail: jwatson@olemiss.edu. Decisions for all submissions will be made by March 15, 2014.

The John W. Hunt Memorial Scholarship and the Faulkner Journal Scholarship
The William Faulkner Society offers scholarships for as many as two graduate students to attend the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford, Mississippi. These awards are funded by generous donations in memory of Faulkner scholar John W. Hunt, author of William Faulkner: Art in Theological Tension, by the Faulkner Journal, and by annual dues from members of the Society. The scholarships cover the costs of registration for the conference and of the students' choice of an organized day trip during the week.

Graduate students may apply directly for the Hunt / Faulkner Journal Scholarships or be nominated by a faculty member. Each application should include: a letter from the student explaining how the student's work can be enhanced by attending the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference; a current curriculum vitae; and at least one letter of recommendation from a faculty member familiar with the student's work--a letter of nomination satisfies this requirement. Send applications to Deborah Clarke, President, The Faulkner Society, Office of the Vice Provost and Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Box 876505, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6505 or email: Deborah.Clarke@asu.edu. Deadline for applications is March 15, 2014.

Spring 2010 Newsletter

Letter from the President

Dear WFS members,

I hope this message finds you in a cool and comfortable place, productively immersed in Faulkner matters.  Since the last WFS newsletter in November, there have been a number of Society events and other developments worth your attention.  So let’s get right to it.

MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL DRIVE

This summer, as he has worked to update and reorganize our membership rolls, Ted Atkinson, our Secretary-Treasurer, has discovered that a significant number of memberships have lapsed.  Because there is currently no process in place for notifying members when this happens, and because we continue to send out the newsletter and other official WFS correspondence to everyone on the membership list, many of you may believe that your membership is paid up when it has in fact expired.  To address this problem, and with the added goal of increasing Society revenue, we are launching a WFS membership “renewal drive” in the months ahead. 

Here’s how the drive will work.  Over the remainder of the summer, Ted will be contacting lapsed members with an email notice that will include a gentle reminder (or think of it as an invitation) to renew, an embedded link to PayPal for those who prefer to use a credit card, and a ground address for those who would rather renew by sending in a check.  As these renewals come in, Ted will be busy rearranging the membership list chronologically (by date of renewal) rather than alphabetically, which will make it possible for us to notify you automatically in the future when your membership is on the verge of expiring.

In the meantime, let me invite all of you to help out with this effort by encouraging friends and colleagues to renew their memberships, or to join our organization, by visiting the Membership page of the WFS website at http://faulknersociety.com/membership.htm

RECENT AND UPCOMING CONFERENCE ACTIVITY

Friday, May 28, was WFS Day at this year’s American Literature Association conference in San Francisco, with a pair of Society-sponsored panels and the annual business meeting among the day’s events.  At the morning’s session on “Faulkner and the Uses of Philosophy,” roughly two dozen audience members were treated to a trio of fine papers:  Joost Burgers’ account of anti-Semitic conspiracy theory as a modernist philosophy in Faulkner, Proust, Musil, and other twentieth-century writers; James Harker’s provocative intervention in the long debate concerning Faulkner’s intellectual debts to Henri Bergson; and Sharon Desmond Paradiso’s deft applications of Derrida to illuminate “The Necessary Hostipitality of Light in August.”  After lunch, an equally well-attended panel on “Legacies of Encounter in Faulkner” featured Sandra Cox’s ethnographically informed analysis of “the semiotics of vanishing” in Faulkner’s Indian stories; Scott Moore’s musings on “bootlegging alienation” in Light in August; and Gary Rees’s postcolonial reflections on the role of Africa in A Fable.  (For the minutes from the business meeting, see below.  If the minutes seem a little spotty, please forgive me.  As I am now all too aware, it can be difficult taking minutes for a meeting when you are also attempting to run it.)

We are also looking forward with real excitement to our two WFS panels at MLA 2011 in Los Angeles.  Some of you may not be aware that, beginning in 2011, MLA allied organizations such as WFS are no longer guaranteed two sessions at the annual convention.  Instead, we are guaranteed a single session, with the opportunity to propose a second, nonguaranteed session to the convention program committee.  Session 117, our guaranteed session for 2011 is “The Faulkner-Oprah File,” a roundtable marking the five-year anniversary of the 2005 “Summer of Faulkner” sponsored by Oprah’s Book Club.  Session co-chairs Jaime Harker (U of Mississippi) and Cecila Farr (St. Catherine’s Women’s C) will be joined by a pair of scholars who served as online lecturers and consultants for the “Summer of Faulkner” project, Thadious Davis (U of Pennsylvania) and Robert Hamblin (S.E. Missouri SU), to discuss Faulkner’s place in contemporary print culture and the challenges and rewards of exploring his works with nonacademic readerships.  According to the latest convention program draft, the panel is scheduled for Thursday, January 6, 2011, from 3:30-4:45 p.m. in Diamond Salon 2 at the J. W. Marriott.

WFS also submitted a successful proposal for a nonguaranteed session, “Imagining the Animal in Faulkner,” that aims to capitalize on the increasing interest in animal studies scholarship evidenced by the recent special issue of PMLA.  The panel, session 563, will feature papers by Kristin Fujie of Ripon C (“‘THE book of which those others were but foals’:  The Personal, the Aesthetic, and the Mammalian in Flags in the Dust”), Sandra K. Stanley of California SU, Northridge (“The Buzzard Reality of As I Lay Dying”), and Bart H. Welling of the U of North Florida (“Lion in the Garden:  Paradox and the Question of the Posthuman in Go Down, Moses”).  This session is currently scheduled for Saturday, January 8, 2011, from 1:45-3:00 p.m. in Platinum Salon I, J. W. Marriott.  For abstracts of the session papers, visit http://faulknersociety.com/panels.htm after 15 December 2010.

The Board has additionally embarked on some longer-range conference planning for upcoming years.  In 2011, WFS will join the Willa Cather Foundation in devoting one of its allotted ALA sessions to a mini-symposium on comparative approaches to the two authors.  The plan is for symposium sessions to be scheduled consecutively in the same room, allowing the co-organizers to showcase the work of a half-dozen or more scholars on the topic.  If successful, this joint project could open the way for collaborations with other literary societies in the future, at ALA or elsewhere.  A call for papers will be circulated in the fall, but in the meantime, I’d also like to invite suggestions from the members about scholars we might want to encourage to submit a paper proposal for this session.  Email me at jwatson@olemiss.edu if you have any recommendations.

For MLA 2012 in Seattle, WFS has invited a pair of scholars from the University of Virginia, Steven Railton and Stephen Knepper, to organize a roundtable on Faulkner and digital humanities.  The Board is still bouncing around ideas for a second 2012 session.  Recent suggestions include:

--Faulkner and consumer culture
--Foodways in Faulkner
--Travel in Faulkner
--Faulkner’s work and Faulkner studies in China

Again, please feel free to contact me by email if you have other suggestions.

Finally, with an eye toward extending the WFS “brand name” beyond our annual presence at ALA and MLA, the Board plans to develop a session proposal for the 2012 meeting of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL).  We are approaching the planned session as a pilot project, with the question of a continuing WFS presence at SSSL, a biennial conference, to be taken up by Deborah Clarke and her new Board when she becomes WFS President in 2012.

2010 HUNT SCHOLAR

The Society is pleased to support the work of graduate students pursuing research on William Faulkner through the John W. Hunt Scholarships.  These awards, which help fund travel to the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference at the U of Mississippi, are co-sponsored by the WFS and The Faulkner Journal and are accompanied by a waiver of the conference registration fee.  This year the Society has chosen an international student, Stefan Solomon of the U of New South Wales, as its 2010 Hunt Scholar.  Stefan will present his panel paper, "A Man Alone . . .":  Faulkner's Characters on Page and Screen," at the “Faulkner and Film” conference in Oxford next week.

Please keep the Hunt Scholarships in mind as an opportunity for talented graduate students working on Faulkner-related projects under your direction or that of your colleagues, and encourage your colleagues to nominate deserving students for the award.  Instructions for nominating students can currently be found near the bottom of the WFS homepage.  The application deadline for the next round of Hunt Scholarships will be March 15, 2011.

2011 FAULKNER AND YOKNAPATAWPHA CONFERENCE

The conference theme for Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha 2011 will be “Faulkner’s Geographies.”  The call for papers will invite submissions in the form of 45-50-minute plenary papers, abstracts for 20-minute panel presentations, and additional proposals for panel papers on the broader subject of “Southern Literary Geographies.”  The CFP should be posted to the WFS website within the next few weeks, where it can be accessed on the index page.

NORMAN MAILER CENTER TRAVEL STUDY PROGRAM

In June the Board approved a request from the Norman Mailer Center and Writers Colony for WFS “association” with the Mailer Center’s 2010-2011 Travel Study program.  The program will send American scholars to several Chinese universities later this year to lecture on major U.S. writers (including Faulkner), and will bring a group of emerging writers and artists from China and India to the U.S. in September 2011 for a “literary journey” to prominent sites in American literary culture, including Faulkner’s Oxford.  No financial commitment is called for on WFS’s part, only permission to use our name in NMC material advertising the Travel Study program, in exchange for which NMC will feature a link to the WFS website on its site.

In addition, the Board has been asked to identify Faulkner scholars who might be interested in participating in the Chinese or U.S. legs of the NMC Travel Study program.  I will be happy to pass along to the program director the name of any WFS member who contacts me to express interest in participating. 

* * *
The minutes from the business meeting follow. Best wishes for the coming months, and please continue to include the William Faulkner Society and its sponsored activities in your scholarly plans.  The coming year looks to be another fruitful one in the field of Faulkner studies.

Cordially,

Jay Watson

MINUTES FROM THE WFS BUSINESS MEETING AT ALA 2010

The meeting took place at the Hyatt Embarcadero, San Francisco, on Friday, May 28, 2010.  It was called to order at 3:30 p.m.  WFS President Jay Watson, Vice President Deborah Clarke, Webmaster David Davis, and around ten other members and other interested parties were in attendance.

Jay opened the meeting by presenting a report on Society finances from Secretary-Treasurer Ted Atkinson:

The membership list contains contact information for 166 people. However, only 41 of those members are current in their dues. For 64 members, there is no record of when they last paid dues. The high number of returned emails when we sent the MLA and ALA CFPs suggests that we have outdated contact information for a significant number of members. There is likely correlation between the lapsed memberships and the outdated contact information. In short, we have a serious issue to address regarding membership. We need to encourage lapsed members to return to the fold, as it were, and try to obtain updated contact information for as many people as possible. The secretary-treasurer and the president have discussed the possibility of holding a membership drive. Perhaps the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference this summer would be a good place to start the effort to attract new members.

The information above came to light during initial efforts to reorganize the membership list. The plan is to create an Excel spreadsheet that will organize members by the date of membership expiration. Using this list, the S-T can send emails each month to let members know that their memberships are about to expire. While creating a new version of the list will be labor intensive, the added task of sending notifications to members once the new list is completed should not be onerous. Also, it should improve the rate of members who remain current in their dues.

The current balance of the WFS account is $2316.39. The major expenditure for last year was $500 awarded to the Hunt Scholarship recipient to attend the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference. The major expenditure for this year will be $700 awarded to Stefan Solomon, the recipient of this year’s Hunt Scholarship. The increase in funding is due to the fact that Stefan will be traveling to the conference from Sydney, Australia. The Faulkner Journal has contributed $500 toward the scholarship, making the award this year $1,200.

Jay then moved on to an update on WFS-sponsored sessions for MLA 2011 in Los Angeles. “Imagining the Animal in Faulkner” (nonguaranteed session, approved) will feature papers by Kristin Fujie, U California, Berkeley (“‘THE book of which those others were but foals’:  The Personal, the Aesthetic, and the Mammalian in Flags in the Dust”), Sandra K. Stanley, California SU, Northridge (“The Buzzard Reality of As I Lay Dying”), and Bart H. Welling, U of North Florida (“Lion in the Garden: Paradox and the Question of the Posthuman in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses”).  “The Faulkner-Oprah File:  A Roundtable on ‘The Summer of Faulkner’” (guaranteed session), will feature remarks by Robert Hamblin (Southeast Missouri SU), Thadious Davis, (U of Pennsylvania), Jaime Harker (U of Mississippi), and Cecilia Farr (St. Catherine’s Women’s C, St. Paul, MN). 

The next item of business was an ALA 2011 preview:  the WFS Board has been consulting with John Swift (Willa Cather Foundation) and Alfred Bendixon (ALA conference director) about a collaborative effort on Cather and Faulkner consisting of multiple sessions formatted consecutively as a “mini-symposium.”  WFS would devote one of its guaranteed sessions to the event and WCF would do the same, with the possibility of ALA kicking in a third session “gratis” if the quality of the submissions is strong.  The prospects look good and may be a hint of future ALA collaborations to come between WFS and other author or literary societies.  Some suggestions from the floor about possible topics for future collaborations:  Faulkner and Morrison (with the Morrison Society), Faulkner and Hemingway (with the Hemingway Society), Faulkner and Women Writers (with the Society for American Women Authors, currently chaired by WFS Vice-President Deborah Clarke). 

Other possible ALA session topics suggested from the floor:

--Teaching Faulkner (or, more specifically, Teaching As I Lay Dying, in conjunction with the MLA volume in the works)
--Faulkner and Sports
--Labor and Identity (or Labor and Characterization) in Faulkner

Next up was an MLA 2012 update.  WFS has asked Steven Railton and Stephen Knepper, both of the U of Virginia, to organize and chair a roundtable on Faulkner and digital humanities (“Digital Faulkner”?).  It hasn’t yet been decided whether the speakers will be by invitation only or whether there will be a CFP later this year.

Jay then went on to solicit feedback from the membership about an issue the Board has been debating:  the possibility of expanding WFS conference “presence” beyond ALA and MLA.  The upside:  increasing visibility for the Society.  The downside:  concerns about diluting the WFS “brand name” and about “proposal fatigue” among the Board members as a result of running additional CFPs each year.  To date the Board’s discussions have focused on SSSL (Society for the Study of Southern Literature, which meets in even-numbered years), and MSA (Modernist Studies Association, which meets annually).  We are leaning toward a “pilot” program consisting of session proposals for MSA 2011 and SSSL 2012, with the plan being to let Deborah and her Board review the results when she takes over as President in 2012 and make a recommendation to the membership at a subsequent business meeting about whether future involvement with these conferences is warranted.  In the meantime, the Board will continue to be open to ad hoc affiliations with panels at the regional MLAs, as at SAMLA last November, where WFS lent its name to a panel on “The Scrutiny of the Public Eye in the Work of William Faulkner” but was not involved in jurying the CFP. 

Several members expressed concern from the floor that putting together MSA session proposals might not be a productive use of the Board’s time, given the fact that MSA explicitly discourages single-author sessions on its conference website.  Other conferences suggested as possible WFS “destinations” included the annual ALA symposium on American Fiction in Savannah, the International American Studies Association conference (held in odd-numbered years and slated for Brazil in 2011), and conferences oriented specifically toward the teaching of literature.

Finally, Jay asked whether anyone present was familiar with the activities or general reputation of the Norman Mailer Center and Writers Colony in Provincetown.  The Society has been approached by NMCWC about supporting its inaugural Travel Study program in 2010-2011, which will promote cultural exchange with Asian writers and scholars in the field of American literary studies.  No monetary commitment is being requested; rather, NMCWC is asking for three things:  (1) permission to list WFS alongside the Steinbeck, Hemingway, Wharton, and other societies as an organizational co-sponsor of the Travel Study program (in exchange NMCWC will put up a link to the WFS website on its site); (2) for the names of several Faulkner scholars who could be contacted about participating in the summer 2011 “Literary Journey” program that will bring Asian writers and scholars to the U.S., including Oxford, Mississippi; and (3) for the names of scholars who could be invited to participate in a planned 10-14-day trip to China in November 2010 to lecture on Faulkner’s work at several universities there.

General consensus ran in favor of supporting this program.  John Duvall noted from the floor that he had recently inspected the NMCWC website and from all appearances the organization appeared to be generously funded.  Jay promised to take this input back to the Board in June.

The meeting was adjourned at around 4:20 p.m.


Fall 2009 Newsletter

Letter from the President

Dear WFS members,

It’s a pleasure, as one of my inaugural acts as your new president, to bring you up to date about WFS-related activities since the spring newsletter.  These activities include the election of a new slate of WFS officers for 2009-2012, our two sessions and annual business meeting at the American Literature Association conference in May, our co-sponsorship of four outstanding graduate students as John W. Hunt Scholars at the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference in July, our offer of WFS affiliation to an upcoming panel on Faulkner at the South Atlantic MLA conference in Atlanta this November, and initial planning and discussion for next year’s ALA and MLA panels.

I’m delighted to introduce the new officers you elected in April to join me on the WFS Board.  Our new Vice President is Deborah Clarke of Arizona State University.  Our incoming Secretary-Treasurer is Ted Atkinson, whom we should also congratulate on joining the faculty of Mississippi State University this fall.  (Ted provides a brief report on the Society’s membership and finances below.)  Our Representatives at Large are Leigh Anne Duck of the University of Memphis and Taylor Hagood of Florida Atlantic University, and they are rather literally at large this fall term, as Leigh Anne is teaching abroad in Copenhagen and Taylor in Munich.  I’m looking forward very much to working with such an energetic and capable group of officers.

Announcing the new Board also gives me the opportunity to thank our outgoing officers for their generous service and able leadership over the past three years.  I’m sure you’ll all agree that the Faulkner Society owes Jack Matthews, our outgoing President; Peter Lurie, our outgoing Secretary-Treasurer; and At-Large officers John Duvall and Doreen Fowler a special debt of gratitude for a diverse series of outstanding panels and sessions at our annual conferences and for the many other ways in which their input has guided and invigorated the Society.  In addition I owe a personal debt of thanks to Jack for his mentorship throughout my term as Vice-President.  It has been a pleasure learning the WFS ropes from him!

One of Jack’s final acts as President was to help prepare the materials (and supply institutional memory) for our MLA seven-year review as an Allied Organization.  Many long-time members no doubt recall that the road to Allied status, which was not awarded until 2002, was a long and contentious one, so it was gratifying to be able to document for the Program Committee our thriving membership numbers and many diverse activities in support of Faulkner scholarship over recent years.  As of this mid-October writing, I can report that the Committee has forwarded a recommendation for renewal of our Allied status to the Executive Council, whose favorable decision we expect in November.

On to scholarly matters.  Once again in 2009 the Society sponsored two Faulkner sessions at the American Literature Association conference in Boston.  Each session drew an audience of around 30 attendees and was followed by a spirited Q&A period and appreciative discussion that spilled out of the salon into the reception area outside.  An open-topic session chaired by Jay Watson brought together Benjamin D. Hagen’s fresh take on Faulknerian temporality in The Sound and the Fury, Heather Holcombe’s analysis of embodied female subjectivity and the modern discourse of reproductive rights in As I Lay Dying, and Peter Lurie’s work on cinema spectatorship as a mode of raced, classed subject formation among Yoknapatawpha’s white citizens.  The following day Peter served as chair and session organizer for our other panel, “Faulkner and the Metropolis,” where audience members were treated to Anne Hirsch Moffitt’s account of the modern city as an encroaching specter haunting the imagination of rural characters and communities in Go Down, Moses, Cheryl Lester’s excavations of a black metropolitan sensibility at work in Sanctuary, and Barbara Ladd’s paper on the national, imperial, and colonial elements of Faulkner’s portrait of Paris in A Fable.

I should note that Peter Lurie is now at work expanding the “Faulkner in the Metropolis” session into a special issue of The Faulkner Journal.  A call for papers has been posted to the index page of the WFS website at http://faulknersociety.com

Minutes from the WFS business meeting at ALA follow the Secretary-Treasurer’s report below.  While we are on the subject of these meetings, I should point out that current MLA policy concerning business meetings at the annual convention makes it increasingly difficult to schedule and run such meetings there.  As an Allied Organization, we are allotted two session slots at MLA, one of which we may opt to use for a business meeting, which of course would mean giving up an academic panel.  We’ll see if the scheduling is handled any differently when the convention moves to January in 2011, but for now the WFS continues to opt against sacrificing a scholarly session for an administrative one.  There was as a result no WFS business meeting at MLA 2008 in San Francisco, and I do not at present plan to hold one at MLA 2009 in Philadelphia.

We look forward with great anticipation to our two MLA sessions this December.  Session 391, “Faulkner in the 1950s,” will feature presentations by Caroline Miles (U of Texas-Pan American), Joseph Urgo (Hamilton C), and Michael Zeitlin (U of British Columbia).  Session organizer Katie Kodat (Hamilton C) will serve as moderator for the panel, which is scheduled for Tuesday, December 29, from 10:15-11:30 a.m. in Grand Ballroom Salon J, Philadelphia Marriott.  Session 699, “Faulkner and the Environment,” includes papers by Stefan Solomon (U of New South Wales), Michael Beilfuss (Texas A&M), and Bart Welling (U of North Florida) and will be chaired by Jay Watson.  The panel is slated for Wednesday, December 30, from 12:00-1:15 p.m. in Grand Ballroom Salon I at the Marriott.  Please mark your calendars and join us for what promises to be an illuminating pair of sessions.

Between now and December, let me also advise those of you who will be attending the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) conference in Atlanta (November 6-8) that the conference schedule includes a Faulkner session being presented in affiliation with the WFS.  “The Scrutiny of the Public Eye in the Work of William Faulkner,” organized and chaired by Victoria Bryan, a graduate student at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, will feature papers by Randall Wilhelm (U of Tennessee, Knoxville), Rachel Walsh (SUNY Stony Brook), and Major Scott Chancellor (U of Mississippi).  As of this writing, the final program copy is not yet up on the SAMLA convention website, but the tentative schedule lists the panel as session #125, Saturday, November 7, from 2:45-4:15 p.m. in Georgia Ballroom East of the Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown.  Kudos to Victoria for her initiative in putting together this panel and approaching the WFS Board with a request to extend affiliation to the session.

Our association with this panel raises the issue of whether the WFS should consider extending its institutional presence beyond MLA and ALA to smaller or regional conferences (such as SAMLA, SCMLA, SSSL) by organizing and sponsoring regular Faulkner sessions there.  This is a question that the Board plans to take up this spring, after reviewing the quality and quantity of submissions for next year’s national conference sessions.  We will to report on our deliberations at the May business meeting at ALA and discuss how to proceed from there.  In the meantime, we welcome your input on the matter.

The Society continues to take pride in supporting the work of graduate students pursuing research on William Faulkner through the John W. Hunt Scholarships.  These awards, which support travel to the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference at the U of Mississippi, are co-sponsored by the WFS and The Faulkner Journal, and, thanks to the largesse of F&Y Conference Director Don Kartiganer, they are accompanied by a waiver of the conference registration fee.  This year, after reviewing an unusually strong set of applications, the WFS was pleased to name four students—an unprecedented number—as recipients of the Hunt Scholarship:  Joanna Davis-McElligatt of the University of Iowa, Steven Knepper of the University of Virginia, Anne Moffitt of Princeton University (and of the “Faulkner and the Metropolis” panel), and Rachel Walsh of SUNY Stony Brook.  These young scholars were recognized at the opening night festivities and conducted themselves with enthusiasm and professionalism throughout the conference week, making their presence felt at the plenary sessions (Rachel was in fact a panelist at one of these sessions) and at the less strictly scholarly events.  Having had the good fortune to meet all four awardees, I can vouch for the fact that the Society’s investment in their Faulkner conference experience was a sound one.

As we move ahead with the year, then, please keep the Hunt Scholarships in mind as a possibility for talented graduate students working on Faulkner-related projects, and encourage your colleagues to nominate deserving students for the award.  Instructions for nominating students can currently be found at the bottom of the WFS homepage.  The application deadline is March 15, 2010.

A few brief notes and requests before closing.  The conference theme for Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha 2010 is “Faulkner and Film.”  A call for papers has been posted to the WFS website, where it can be accessed on the index page.

The Board is currently brainstorming about topics for WFS sessions at ALA 2010 in San Diego and MLA 2011 (January) in Los Angeles.  Some possibilities currently under discussion, which I will for the most part leave unannotated in the hope of keeping them suggestive: Digital Faulkner; Faulkner and Print Culture; Faulkner’s Lives (don’t ask me what it means, but everyone on the Board found the idea deliciously cryptic); “Slow Faulkner”; Philosophical Approaches to Faulkner; comparative sessions with Faulkner and other authors (Marquez? Cather? Morrison?); critical assessments of recent Faulkner scholarship; Faulkner and Consumerism; Industrialization and Technology in Faulkner.  We invite you to send us your preferences or other ideas for either or both conferences.  Feel free to contact me or any of the other WFS officers with suggestions; our contact information is available on the WFS website.  Once the Board formalizes the calls for papers, we’ll post them to the website and send out a notification.  The deadline for ALA paper or session proposals is January 15, 2010, and for MLA papers or sessions is March 1, 2010.  In both cases proposals should be directed electronically to me.

Finally, if you need to renew your membership for the coming year, or if you need to find out when your membership is due to expire, contact Ted Atkinson.

Best wishes for the months, and the conferences, ahead.  It should be an exciting year for Faulkner studies!

Cordially,
Jay Watson

Secretary-Treasurer's Report, Fall 2009
First, I want to thank Peter Lurie for his patience during my transition to the post of Secretary-Treasurer. He graciously agreed to continue taking care of business this past summer until I was able to move from Augusta to Starkville to assume my new position at Mississippi State University. Peter, and I struggled mightily with PayPal during the transition, resulting in a brief removal of the PayPal option from the WFS website. I am pleased to report that the option is now in place again and fully operational.

The Society roster currently lists 252 members, although several of those need to pay dues to make their membership status current. I am in the process of converting the membership list from MS Word to MS Excel and making a version of the list that arranges entries by membership expiration date. This reconfigured list will enable me to send notices on a monthly basis to those whose memberships will soon lapse. My hope is that this new system will improve the rate of membership renewal.

The WFS account balance is now $1,385.13, with the only recent activity being income from membership dues and disbursements to The Faulkner Journal for members who pay for subscriptions when submitting their dues.

Respectfully submitted,
Ted Atkinson

Minutes from the ALA Business Meeting
Faulkner Society Business Meeting: American Literature Association Conference May 22, 2009- Boston, MA

The meeting took place in the Copley Place Westin Hotel.

Outgoing President John Matthews made a few remarks to start the meeting before handing matters over to Jay Watson, incoming WFS President, including the following:

He mentioned the Society having had six applicants for Hunt fellowships to attend the 2009 Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference from the following universities: Stonybrook (NY), University of Iowa, Princeton, University of Kansa and and UVA.  He then described the process of settling on the number of fellowships and indicated that the Society offered 4 scholarships.  These amounted to payments of $350 and a waiver of the Faulkner Conference fee.

He then asked for a brief report from the outgoing Treasurer-Secretary, Peter Lurie.

Peter indicated the approximate membership number of WFS and the roughly $1200 currently in the WFS checking account.  He noted that this was a smaller amount than in past years due to the increased number of Hunt fellows and the higher stipend amounts that went to them.

Peter suggested that the Society approach The Faulkner Journal to change the setup for payments for journal subscriptions, asking if we could not combine those payments with dues payments to the WFS.

Jack concluded his comments by acknowledging the work of the other outgoing officers of the WFS and thanking them for their service.  He included mention of the very helpful work done by current and ongoing “Webmaster,” David A. Davis.

Jay then began the running of the meeting.  He asked that we all put out a reminder to nominate students for Hunt fellowships in future years.  He reminded everyone that the annual deadline for applications is March 1 and described the application requirements: a letter of application from student, CV, and letter of support from advisor.  He repeated the Society’s commitment to encouraging and attracting good, suitable students/applicants.

Jay then listed the MLA 09 panels: “Faulkner in the 1950s” (chaired by Katie Kodat, with papers by Joseph Urgo, Caroline Miles, and Mike Zeitlin) and “Faulkner and the Environment” (listed panelists).

Jay referred to the upcoming F&Y Conference: July 19-23 and let everyone know that Don Kartiganer will give a paper as “swan song” or send off before his retirement.  He suggested that the 2010 F& Y conference topic could likely be “Faulkner and Film.”

He asked for suggestions for possible panel topics for next year’s ALA and MLA:

Tom McHaney suggested “Faulkner and Philosophy”

Cheryl Lester raised the idea of “Digital Faulkner” and pointed to the attending legal issues surrounding digital publishing.  Suggested that this could be either a panel topic and/or a relevant question for scholars about new ways to publish Faulkner as well as work about him.
Tom pointed to the Concordances as likely digital material; he said he’d talked with Noel Polk and referred to the “punch cards” which are still available from University of (Southern?) Mississippi.  Jack mentioned that we should approach Random House and ask them about what copyright issues there are.  Barbara Ladd offered that for the 19th C, everything is out of copyright.

Barbara then added: we should think about new formats for publishing The Faulkner Journal, including only publishing it on line.  Suggested that it would be easier to do than we might expect. Mentioned the “Nons” (?) project at UVa….

Jack said he’d talked with an editor at Blackwell about “bundling” the FJ with 5 other journals as a subscription package for university libraries, possibly for individuals.

Jay suggested a panel on “Faulkner and Print Culture/The History of the Book,” referred to a potential synergy with people doing work on digital publishing.  Asked for general input about people who may be in involved.

Barbara: what about panel topics that combine WF with other writers (F & Marquez; F & Morrison).  Jay followed up, suggesting we could treat the matter as something like an alternaing “home court,” going back & forth between sponsoring dual-author panels with the other author society(s).

Pearl McHaney asked to follow this option with a more focused idea, e.g., “F & Marquez & Rape,” suggesting that orienting topical panels in this way would help avoid so devolving into discussions of influence, etc.

Tom: let’s get in touch with international colleagues, ask about international influences on Faulkner or other work on him happening overseas.

Barbara: let’s go after more recent authors; invite them to give a panel, roundtable.

Peter suggested that the “book response” version of the Dec. 08 MLA panel with Eric Lott responding to Katie’s Henninger’s book; Judith Miller weighing in on Leigh Ann Duck’s book, etc., worked very well.

Jay: the roundtable (again) has been great; Barbara said that the “slow reading” Faulkner panel approaches have been popular.

Peter raised the issue of WFS officer elections (or the lack of outside nominations). He asked if we want to invigorate that process or try to avoid uncontested elections.

Peter: How’s the current listserv, Society discussion page doing? Jack and Barbara both answered that they did not find the WF listserv a very valuable forum.

The meeting was adjourned.

Spring 2009 Newsletter

Election of New Officers
This spring the WFS will hold its regular elections of new officers.  Positions to be filled with three-year terms are Vice President, Secretary-Treasurer, and two Members-at-Large.  Our by-laws stipulate that the vacated presidency is to be filled by the current vice president at the conclusion of their terms.  In this case Jay Watson will begin his term as President in May, 2009, with the other slate of new officers.  Please send nominations (whether of yourself or another Society member) to me (jtmattws@bu.edu) by April 1, 2009.  You should include a brief statement describing the nominee’s interest in the Society and qualifications for office.  Members will be mailed an electronic ballot around April 15, and will have two weeks to return their votes. 

John W. Hunt Scholarships to Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference 2009
As in the past, the WFS will sponsor one or two doctoral level graduate students to attend the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford, MS this summer.  Nominees should send a letter of application, including a brief description of their dissertation project, and a letter of support from a faculty supervisor, to DELETED EXTRA “TO” John T. Matthews, President, The Faulkner Society, Boston University, Department of English, 236 Bay State Road, Boston, MA 02215 or to jtmattws@bu.edu.  Electronic submissions preferred.  Deadline: March 31. 

Fall 2008 Newsletter

Letter from the President

Dear Members:

If you can take a few minutes from perching on the ledge, while stealing peeks back into the room at the current TV poll numbers, I have a few modest distractions to offer you about the activities of the Faulkner Society over recent months.

In May we sponsored two lively and extremely well-attended sessions at the American Literature Association conference in San Francisco.  A round-table on teaching Faulkner in new contexts featured talks by Melanie Benson, Deborah Clarke, Caroline Garnier, Valerie Loichot, and Terrell Tebbets on a wide variety of approaches to studying Faulkner’s writing—in the contexts of native American culture, modernism and gender, African American literature, Caribbean writers, and contemporary Southern fiction.  A second panel gave us papers on historicizing race in Faulkner, with presentations by Joanna Davis-McElligatt on immigration law and Light in August, and by David Ball on the racial dimension of early advertising culture as reflected in the mention of stove polish in Absalom, Absalom!  Both sessions drew in excess of fifty audience members—rooms were filled to capacity, and both concluded with vigorous and sustained conversations.  Abstracts for some of these papers may be found on the WFS website (http://faulknersociety.com/).

Minutes of the business meeting at ALA appear below.

We look forward to two superb sessions at MLA this year: a round-table (with short presentations by each participant) addressing new scholarship under the rubric “Why Faulkner Now?”  The panelists will be Hosam Aboul-Ela, Deborah Cohn, Richard Godden, Barbara Ladd, and Harilaos Stecopoulos.  A second session will address Faulkner and modernist studies, with papers by Florence Dore, Jolene Hubbs, and Judith Sensibar.  Details of the MLA schedule appear below.

We invite you to propose topics for the calls for papers we will be posting shortly to organize Society sessions at ALA in Boston 2009 and MLA in Philadelphia 2009.  Please send ideas to me or any of the officers.

The Faulkner Society will also be electing new officers this spring.  Current Vice President Jay Watson will begin his three-year term as President in May, 2009 (the vice president succeeding to president, as stipulated in our by-laws).  But all other new officers will be elected, and we’ll be inviting nominations (self- and otherwise) during a period early in the new year.  Election procedures will be described then.  We encourage anyone interested in participating in Society affairs to contact us as early as you’d like.

We’ll send around notice of the calls for papers later in the fall, and tell you where they’ve been posted (including our website). 

Jay Watson reports that next year’s topic for the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford will be “Faulkner and Mystery.” 

If you haven’t renewed you membership for this year (or for a multiple year membership of your choice), please contact Peter Lurie.

All best wishes,

John Matthews

Summary of Business Meeting at ALA (May 22, 2008)

About fifteen members and interested colleagues gathered for the Society business meeting at ALA this past spring.  The meeting was convened by John Matthews (President), and began by reviewing the status of the Society’s finances.  (See the separate up-to-date treasurer’s report elsewhere in this newsletter.)  The new Pay Pal system for direct electronic payment of dues works well.  Funds continue to allow funding for the Hunt Scholarship program to the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference.  This year there were three well qualified nominees, all of whom received travel awards to attend: Matthew Vaughn, a doctoral student at the University of Tulsa writing a dissertation under James Watson’s direction; Sarah Mahurin, a doctoral student at Yale working with Robert Stepto and Wai-Chee Dimock, and Elizabeth Cornell, who is writing a dissertation at Fordham with Maria Farland.  The Hunt Scholars were awarded additional waivers of conference fees by the Yoknapatawpha Conference, and the Society expressed its gratitude to Donald Kartiganer, its director, for the Conference’s generosity.

Discussion of possible topics for upcoming Society panels at ALA and MLA in 2009 generated the following suggestions for subjects and contexts to explore in Faulkner’s writing: environmental studies; international writers; contemporary writers; ethics; faith or religion; humor; the 1950s; the state of the union.

An announcement about our election year for new officers of the Society was made.  We’ll be electing new officers in all but the President’s capacity (the Vice President succeeding to a three-year term as President): Vice President; Secretary-Treasurer; and two new members-at-large. 

A representative from Wiley-Blackwell Publishing made a brief presentation about a new packaged series of scholarly journals being developed.  She was interested in the prospects of recruiting The Faulkner Journal to the list.      


Secretary-Treasurer’s Report, Fall 2008

As of September 2008, the Society has approximately 330 members.  Some of these members’ dues are in arrears, but most are current, and many include subscriptions to the Faulkner Journal, with whom the Society coordinates subscriber and members’ payments. 

The Society’s checking account has a balance of $1,819.50.  This reflects the disbursement of $900 to award three Hunt fellowships at the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford, Mississippi in July.  The recipients of these fellowships received a waiver of the conference fee in addition to a $300 stipend each, to be used for travel to the conference.  All three recipients are graduate students who have shown a commitment to serious scholarly engagement with Faulkner studies: Elizabeth Cornell, Fordham University; Sarah Mahurin, Yale University; and Matthew Vaughn, University of Tulsa.

Society members continue to make use of the on-line Pay-pal system via the Society’s website.  This has facilitated the deposits and transfer of members’ dues and, we hope, expedited our correspondence with new and renewing members.  We are continuing to work on further enhancing our web-based system of coordinating memberships and Faulkner Journal subscriptions.

Peter Lurie

The ALA meeting took place on May 25th, 2007, at the Copley Westin Hotel in Boston, MA.

Jack Matthews, Society President, began the meeting by asking those attending to introduce themselves.  He then announced upcoming MLA papers for the conference in Chicago.  He also announced that the WFS website was establishing an independent domain, and would no longer be housed at the U of Mississippi.  David Davis set up the site as a permanent, non-institutional presence, and has agreed to manage it. 

A question came up about posting the Society panel papers on the website before the ALA and MLA conferences, so that people attending those panels could have a better sense of the papers.  Jack suggested posting abstracts before the conference and full texts afterward.  Most agreed that this seemed helpful.

A brief discussion followed about reminders to members about their dues status.   I indicated that reminders about renewing membership are included in each newsletter.  Jack pointed out that people generally don’t welcome multiple emails.

Discussion then turned to the John W. Hunt Memorial Scholarships, under whose name the Society sponsors graduate student awards to attend the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference.  The prize is for students working on Faulkner and pays their conference fee and the price of one of the day tours.

A related question arose about alternative uses of WFS money, such as an annual award for the best new article on Faulkner or the best Faulkner-related book, awarded on a yearly or a three-year cycle.  Mike Zeitlin indicated that The Faulkner Journal presently gives an annual award for the best article.  Jack noted that other author societies do this to note the value of new work.  Peter asked a general question about whether those present thought that granting such an award would be a way of encouraging new and better scholarship—or if we thought that the current state of work on Faulkner was not in need of external bolstering.  

Mike Zeitlin asked about using WFS money to subsidize travel costs to conferences such as the ALA, which was seconded by Deborah Clarke. Jack wondered about the best mechanism for implementing such a fund.  David Earle raised a related question about people applying for “research grants” through the Society to pay for, for example, publishing permissions and copyrights.  Peter asked whether the Hunt fellowship money could also be used for other awards or support.

A brief discussion followed about raising the cost of membership dues or allowing members to contribute additional funds for the purposes of a travel pool.  Most present agreed that the current $10 membership was a fair cost.

Discussion then returned to the question of the Hunt fellowship and the prospect of opening it up to undergraduates.  David Evans asked about announcing it through English departments and the F&Y’s announcement generally.  Jack indicated that it was listed on the Ole Miss website. 

The group then covered the mechanism for listing conference panels and selecting papers.  Jack reminded everyone that CFPs for ALA go out in October and CFPs for MLA go out in January.  Peter mentioned the process of accepting proposals for both pre-constituted panels and stand-alone papers.  Mike asked about the number of submissions for Society-sponsored panels at this year’s conferences.  Jack indicated that the overall numbers of submissions for this year was slightly higher than last but that getting six strong papers per conference out of the submissions is often difficult.  He pointed out that we encourage people to re-submit proposals that have interest but that may not fit a particular panel configuration. 

We moved toward a close by raising possible topics for future Society panels.  Among those mentioned were: Faulkner and disability studies; Faulkner and materialism (with a focus on archival studies); Faulkner and Death (a topic that Mike is working on for a panel with Chip Arnold); Faulkner and Whiteness (to follow up on the current issue of the Faulkner Journal); Faulkner and Economics.

A question arose again about connecting with other author societies and national academic societies, such as the MSA and ASA, and foreign societies such as European American Studies and British Southern Studies.  Someone pointed out that the Louisville conference on narrative is now reserving panels for author societies. 

The meeting closed with a brief discussion of a potential change in format for MLA presentations.  Jack mentioned the prospect of more roundtable discussions, for example.  Deborah Clarke proposed a roundtable on the future of single-author studies…..

The meeting was called to adjourn.

Peter Lurie

Faulkner Society MLA 2007 Business Meeting

This meeting took place on December 28th, 2007, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Chicago, Il.

In attendance: John Matthews (WFS President), Peter Lurie (Secretary-Treasurer), Barbara Ladd, Deborah Clarke, Leigh Ann Duck

Questions arose about the planning and holding of business meetings at the annual MLA and ALA conferences.  Jack mentioned securing a cash bar event for the Society.  This meeting was held in the Hyatt Regency bar at a very small table.

Peter reported on the current amount in the WFS checking account as roughly $3,000.

Peter asked about whether we could find a way for WFS members and renewals to pay for subscriptions to the Faulkner Journal online and directly to the FJ.  Currently the Secretary-Treasurer receives payments for both WFS memberships and FJ subscriptions, then forwards the latter to the FJ.

There was general agreement that a direct method of subscribing on line to the FJ would be good. Jack asked about building membership in the Society. Deborah mentioned that a WFS cash bar would be one way to do so. 

Barbara Ladd brought up the fact that the WFS Calls for Papers for Society sponsored panels are not widely circulated.  She and others mentioned that UPenn’s listserve no longer circulates such information.  General agreement that the Society would like more submissions from which to choose for panel participants at the ALA and MLA conferences.  Jack suggested re-sending the CFPs closer to the deadline.  Barbara mentioned that The Society for the Study of Southern Literature is not active [in circulating Calls], but could be more so.  Someone suggested posting cfps on the University of Rennes, France Faulkner Foundation site.  Peter mentioned contacting Nicole Moulinoux and Jacques Poithier in France about circulating the CFPs among scholars and groups there. Deborah suggested sending the CFPs as an attachment with the WFS newsletter.  Peter mentioned coming up with a duplicate mailing list for the CFPs in addition to the WFS newsletter.  This was followed by a brief discussion about other ways of extending the WFS reach for CFPs.  Barbara asked about Don Kartiganer at U of Mississippi and whether he would be willing he share his mailing list for the Faulkner Conference. Peter mentioned the Society for Cinema and Media Studies listserve.

Jack mentioned that for many conferences, pre-constituted panels fared better than individual papers; all agreed.  He followed with a question about new topics for upcoming panels at the 2008 MLA and ALA conferences.  Below are among the topics mentioned:

Faulkner and Disability studies; Teaching WF; Faulkner and the African Diaspora;
Faulkner and Modernist Studies; Why Faulkner Now?

Jack mentioned the possibility of sharing a topic/panel with the Society for the Study of Southern Literature.  Deb asked about a panel on publishing on Faulkner.  F and the “new literary histories” (how is Faulkner newly theorized, conceptualized within literary history).

Jack mentioned that the Modernist Studies Association and studies of British modernism are better at talking about, say, the crisis of the liberal state and modernism—an offshoot of an earlier proposed panels topic, “Faulkner and the Nation.”

General discussion followed about how to apportion financial support for the Hunt Scholarships and whether we might want to expand the eligible pool for fellowship recipients.  Jack suggested spending one more year with the grant stipulated for graduate students.

Deadlines for submissions to the WFS for ALA and MLA panels were reviewed: 1/15, ALA; 3/15 MLA

Jack mentioned the matter of posting WFS panel papers on the Society webpage and mentioned that he had encountered some difficulty getting all participants to agree to posting full papers. He followed by asking whether we should simply post the paper’s abstracts.

Barbara expressed understanding about some scholars’ reticence to essentially “publish” a paper on line.

The meeting was called to adjourn.

Peter Lurie

 

Summer 2007 Newsletter

Letter from the President

Dear Members:

The Society sponsored two outstanding panels at the American Literature Association Conference in Boston at the end of May: one an omnibus session representing new directions in Faulkner studies, the other a panel on Pylon.  Both sessions were unusually well attended, offered lots of new ideas, and generated excellent conversations.  Full details of the sessions appear on the “Panels” link of our website.  A few of the papers have been posted there; the rest will follow as they are ready.   

The panels for MLA also have been posted on our website; scheduling information will be forthcoming.  We’ll place our calls for papers in October in the U Penn list-serv, with deadlines in January for ALA sessions and March for MLA.  In addition, I welcome inquiries about ideas especially for topics you’d like to see WFS take on, for individual papers or panels, and also for larger projects, such as collaborations with other author societies or cognate professional organizations.   

The Society’s website has moved to its own permanent domain address: http://www.faulknersociety.com/index.htm

Our former site will forward hits directly to the new address.  I want to thank Prof. David Davis, at Wake Forest University, for conducting this switch, and for volunteering to manage the website for the immediate future.  I also want to thank Prof. David Evans of Dalhousie University for having set up the original website, and to the University of Mississippi for hosting the site over the past few years.  The cost of procuring a permanent domain was nominal.  Among other advantages, the site enables us to offer Paypal options for membership dues, a feature especially desirable to international members.  Please check out the new site and send me your reactions!

You’ll find Prof. Peter Lurie’s report on the business meeting elsewhere in this newsletter.  The meeting also was well attended and produced excellent suggestions for expanded uses for some prize money and other modest funds we’ve accumulated. 

I’m pleased to announce that this year’s winner of the John W. Hunt Memorial Scholarship to the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference is Jennie Joiner, a doctoral candidate in English literature at the University of Kansas.  Ms. Joiner has also been selected to present a paper on one of the panels at this year’s conference. 

Our fall newsletter will include a formal reminder to renew your membership before the end of the calendar year.  Memberships run for the calendar year.  Multiple-year renewals make life dreamy.

All best wishes for the remainder of your summer,

John T. Matthews
President                                           

Minutes for the Business Meeting at MLA

The MLA business meeting of the WFS took place on Friday, December 29, 2006 at the Marriot Philadelphia hotel. 

Attendees introduced themselves: Leigh Ann Duck; Anne Goodwyn Jones; David Davis; Robert Dale Parker; Jay Watson (Vice President) John Duvall (member at large); Peter Lurie (Treasurer-Secretary), Jack Matthews (President).

Jack pointed out that because of the fact that there are two panels at MLA sponsored by the Society, we don’t have an officially scheduled meeting time.  Hence the impromptu gathering after the first panel. 

Officers described current WFS activities:

Jack reported that WFS Newsletter had been mailed in the fall, and that its announced changes in policies, such as the calendar for nominating Hunt scholarship, had prompted no objections.  Jack also noted that the board had approved circulating an email-only version of the Newsletter in the future, henceforth a change also indicated in the Fall Newsletter.

Anticipated content for the Spring Newsletter: Hunt scholarships for F&Y; the next year panels at 2007 meetings of the ALA (Boston, May) and MLA (Chicago, December).

Jack then raised some questions about the Hunt scholarships:

He pointed out that last year, there was just one nominee, a beginning graduate student who was eventually awarded the scholarship for 2006.  In 2005 there were three nominees; all were more mature students and reportedly made fuller use of the conference. He encouraged members to consider carefully the maturity of the graduate students we might nominate.

John Duvall suggested that the Hunt nominations include postdoctoral candidates and adjuncts.

Jay asked: would we have to approach the Hunt fellowship sponsors to change the category of nominees?  Several answered said that we wouldn’t have to.

Jay then offered that Master’s level candidates were sometimes not advanced enough in their studies to have committed fully enough to focus on Faulkner.

Jack asked if there were other ways to use the money, such as: a prize for the best grad student essay on Faulkner?  Money for travel to MLA?  Suggested that we solicit from other Society members, other awards that they or their institutions could sponsor.

Peter described the current WFS membership and account.  Total number of new or renewing members was nearly 320, with several members still listed but not necessarily current with dues payments.  As of December, 2006, the WFS account had $2,280.48.  He mentioned the time-intensive process of receiving and depositing checks as dues payments along with the communications to the Faulkner Journal about new subscriptions.

Jack asked about offering multi-year membership as an option.

Jay said he’s spoken to people about the PayPal option, especially for international members-to-be, as a way to facilitate dues payments and allow them to be made on line.

Jack then asked if there were anyone with particular skills of web design who might help with adding a PayPal account to the WFS website.  David Davis offered to lend some help in this capacity.  (He and Peter have since communicated about the account and its launch date will be in early June, 2007).

Jack then raised a new topic.  He indicated that there are many people who work on Faulkner, but who are not members.  He asked about ways to sponsor projects that range outside of single author studies.  

Jay spoke about building relationships w/other author societies: co-sponsoring conference panels, co-authoring papers, among them, the Willa Cather society.   Members suggested talking to their officers in the interest of increasing the range of WFS-involved scholarship.  David suggested Welty and Morrison as other possible links.

Anne Jones mentioned that there is a Faulkner society in Japan and the Faulkner Foundation in Rennes, France.  John Duvall asked about connections with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the U. of Mississippi.

Jay offered that such connections might open up the prospect for another panel at national conferences.  John mentioned the Louisville conference on 20th C. literature. David Davis and Peter Lurie offered a similar statement about MSA.

General discussion followed about other writers gathering momentum through attention at conferences such as Toni Morrison in the 90s.  Jack then asked if we wanted to consider topics that did not restrict themselves to Faulkner.  For instance, a panel on Southern Studies/trauma studies in the South. 

John Duvall responded that The FJ could take that on. 

Anne Jones and others then talked generally about the various conferences and associations doing work that would accommodate Faulkner: the Southern ASA meeting in Oxford in the spring; a Blues Symposium at Ole Miss.

Leigh Ann Duck raised a question that the Society might want to consider, which had to do with impressions outside Faulkner studies about “Why Faulkner?” Jack responded with a reference to Rebecca Mark’s article in the FJ: “Why we should stop teaching Faulkner?”

Anne Jones then mentioned that she was having talks w/Houghton-Mifflin and said that the New Southern Studies series needs its own a publication organ.  Ed Francisco’s collection did not do as well as hoped, so H-M is tentative about an anthology.  Others mentioned that a collection of new Southern materials that would treat Faulkner but also the Caribbean might want to seek another press.

Other discussion followed about a felt need among members for collections, conference work on Faulkner in a hemispheric or global context, potentially in connection with journals or special issues about the Global South.  Jack and Jay brought up connections to the Flannery O’Connor Society via a spring conference at Georgia State.

Jack the raised a new practical consideration by the MLA about holding the convention at a new date such as the first Thursday after Jan. 2; he solicited responses and suggested circulating this question among members.  He also mentioned that the MLA was perhaps going to delete evening sessions.

Others responded that several people do attend the evening sessions.  The greater concern was the MLA scheduling related panels at the same time. 

Following suggestions by many that a later date for the MLA convention was preferable, Anne mentioned that the American Historical Association has its meeting in the same period; she asked if this would pose competition for members.  Robert Dale Parker responded that it would be the publishers who would find the concurrent schedules difficult.

Discussion followed about the overall value and role played by the book exhibits, potentially in relation to the other needs of conference goers.  Several people pointed to the important role played of meeting with publishers, editors, etc. 

Jack raised the important question of pursuing the need for an allocated space during the MLA conference for the WFS business meeting.  Noted that we would like to have such a space without having to give up one of the allocated special sessions.  Others mentioned ideas such as having a cash bar or sharing a space with another author society.

Meeting finished with discussion of possible panel topics for upcoming ALA and next year’s MLA conferences.  Jack indicated that there would be an open CFP for ’07 panels.  Possible topics included Faulkner and African-American/African history (someone mentioned Keith Cartwright’s book on this topic), Faulkner in Haiti and the Caribbean.  Jack mentioned the Society’s effort to have the CFPs genuinely open but to also use them to promote new work or follow up on previously considered topics.  He invited continued input for what panel topics people might suggest.

Meeting was called to adjourn.

Peter Lurie
Secretary-Treasurer

Minutes for the Business Meeting at ALA

The ALA business meeting of the Society took place on May 25th, 2006, at the Copley Westin Hotel in Boston, MA.

Jack Matthews, Society President, began the meeting by asking those attending to introduce themselves.  He then announced the WFS panels selected for the MLA conference in Chicago.  He also announced that the WFS website was establishing an independent domain, to succeed the site maintained by the U of Mississippi.  He referred to the fact that David Davis was managing and setting up the site as a permanent, non-institutional presence. 

A question came up about posting the Society panel papers on the website before the ALA and MLA conferences, so that people attending those panels could have a better sense of the papers.  Jack responded, indicating that he’d prefer to post abstracts of papers before the panel and the full text of papers after the conferences.  Most agreed that this seemed helpful.

A brief discussion followed about the Society reminding members of their status, in which Jack and the Treasurer-Secretary indicated that reminders about renewing membership are included in each newsletter.  Jack pointed out that people generally don’t welcome multiple emails. 

The T-S reported on the status of the Society and its account, indicating that as of April 30th membership was approximately 240 and that the WFS account held $2,354.88.

Discussion then turned to the John W. Hunt Memorial Fund, the sponsor of a graduate student scholarship to attend the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference.  The prize is for students working on Faulkner and it pays for their conference fee and the price of one of the day tours.

A related question was posed about alternative uses of WFS money, such as an annual award for the best new article on Faulkner or the best Faulkner-related book, awarded on a yearly or a three-year cycle.  Mike Zeitlin indicated that Faulkner Journal gives an annual award for the best article.  Jack noted that other author societies do this to recognize the value of new work.  Peter Lurie asked a general question about whether those present thought that granting such an award would be a way of encouraging new and better scholarship—or if we thought that the current state of work on Faulkner was not in need of external bolstering.  

Mike Zeitlin asked about using WFS money to subsidize travel costs to conferences such as the ALA, which was seconded by Deborah Clarke. Jack responded by suggesting an ALA travel fund.  He then asked about the best mechanism for implementing such a fund.  David Earle raised a related question about people applying for “research grants” through the Society to pay for, for example, publishing permissions and copyrights.  Peter asked whether the Hunt fellowship money could also be used for other awards or support.

A brief discussion followed about raising the cost of membership dues or allowing members to contribute additional funds for the purposes of a travel pool.  Most present agreed that the current $10 membership was a fair cost.

Discussion then returned to the question of the Hunt fellowship and the prospect of opening it up to undergraduates.  David Evans asked about announcing it through English departments and the F&Y’s announcement generally.  Jack indicated that it was listed on the Ole Miss website. 

The group then covered the mechanism for listing conference panels and selecting papers.  Jack reminded everyone that CFPs for ALA and MLA go out in October.  Peter mentioned the process of accepting proposals for both pre-constituted panels and stand-alone papers.  Mike asked about the number of submissions for Society-sponsored panels at this year’s conferences.  Jack indicated that the overall numbers of submissions for this year was slightly higher than last but that we’re still working to get six strong papers per conference out of the submissions.  He pointed out that we encourage people to re-submit proposals that have interest but that may not fit a particular panel configuration. 

We moved toward a close by raising possible topics for future Society panels.  Among those mentioned were: Faulkner and disability studies; Faulkner and materialism (with a focus on archival studies); Faulkner and Death (a topic that Mike is working on for a panel with Chip Arnold); Faulkner and Whiteness (to follow up on the current issue of the Faulkner Journal); Faulkner and Economics.

A question arose again about collaborating with other author societies and participating in national academic societies, such as the MSA and ASA, and foreign societies such as European American Studies and British Southern Studies.  Someone pointed out that the Louisville conference on narrative is now reserving panels for author societies. 

The meeting closed with a brief discussion of a potential change in format for MLA presentations.  Jack mentioned the prospect of more roundtable discussions, for example.  Deborah Clarke proposed a roundtable on the future of single-author studies…..

The meeting was called to adjourn.

Peter Lurie
Secretary-Treasurer

Fall 2006 Newsletter

Letter from the President

Dear Members,

It’s my pleasure to write to you as the recently installed president of the society, as well as on behalf of my fellow new officers: Jay Watson, Vice President; Peter Lurie, Secretary-Treasurer; and Doreen Fowler and John Duvall, Members-at-Large. We anticipate a lively three years serving the Faulkner Society.

I want to begin by thanking the outgoing officers for their conscientious work over their terms: Anne Goodwyn Jones, President; Catherine Gunther Kodat, Secretary-Treasurer; and Evelyn Jaffe Schreiber and Donald Kartiganer, Members-at-Large.

Elsewhere in this newsletter you will find the minutes of our last business meeting, held at the ALA Conference in San Francisco in May.  Since then, the board of officers has assembled a list of tasks we’d like to address as we begin our terms.  Some of these ideas are elaborated below in connection with the individual items of Society business that they involve.  We welcome your comments, questions, suggestions of other issues the Society might take up, and, especially, offers of help in any of the initiatives we commit to.  

You’ll also find a calendar of deadlines and other important dates below.  Please let me know if there are others we should incorporate. 

At the members’ business meeting at ALA, those present discussed possible topics for forthcoming conference sessions.  The board proposes that this year we issue calls for papers and panels for ALA and MLA in 2007 inviting submissions on unrestricted topics.  Please see details below.

Don’t hesitate to contact me about these or any other Society matters at jtmattws@bu.edu.

Sincerely,

John T. Matthews
President

Business Meeting Minutes: ALA Conference, Spring 2006  

Business meeting of William Faulkner Society at the American Literature Association held Saturday, May 27, at 2 p.m., at the Hyatt Regency Embarcadero in San Francisco.

Present: outgoing president Anne Goodwyn Jones; outgoing secretary-treasurer Katie Kodat; incoming president Jack Matthews; incoming member-at-large Doreen Fowler; also Deborah Clarke; Millie Kidd; Marty Kreiswirth; Barbara Ladd.

The meeting began with Anne Goodwyn Jones announcing the new WFS officers: Jack as president, Jay Watson as vice-president; Peter Lurie as secretary-treasurer; Doreen Fowler and John Duvall as members-at-large.  Anne expressed her thanks to her outgoing board members; Jack in his turn thanked Anne and Katie for their work for the society.

Jack turned to the issue of WFS panels for ALA and MLA 2007, noting that at this year's MLA the society would sponsor two panels: one called "Faulkner Under Representation" and the other, organized by David Davis, called "Regionalism and Modernism."

The ALA business meeting traditionally has been the place where society members begin brainstorming topics for future convention panels, and this year continued that tradition.  Doreen wondered if we could consider the idea of issuing an open call.  Katie noted the society has done something like that in the past, and Jack concurred, saying that we have issued "flexible calls" that propose topics but invite papers on any topic related to Faulkner.  Marty observed that in practice even panels with topics are often fairly loosely organized.  Jack noted that it seemed MLA panels were more tightly tailored than those at ALA.

Deborah Clarke suggested an "emerging scholars" panel that would feature new voices in Faulkner scholarship.  Doreen suggested a "multicultural Faulkner" panel; Barbara suggested a panel that would read Faulkner through African American history.  Deborah noted the past success of the "teaching Faulkner" panels and suggested that we might want to consider them as a semi-regular feature at ALA, along the lines of the "Slow Reading" panel.  She observed that the "teaching" panels generally seemed more accepted at ALA than MLA.  Doreen wondered why we wouldn't want to propose a "teaching Faulkner" panel for MLA; Anne replied that her sense of MLA was that it was a venue for "cutting edge" scholarship.  Katie noted that recent editions of the ADE's Profession on English and the future of the humanities seem to indicate that the MLA might be becoming more interested in teaching issues as part of its overall growing concern about the state of the profession; Jack noted the recent MLA member survey on the convention that likewise seemed to indicate that the society is considering major changes in the organization of the annual meeting, including the addition of special topic "mini-conferences" within the convention.

Several more topics for panels were suggested: Faulkner and women writers; the idea of hope in Faulkner's fiction; Faulkner and domestic space; Faulkner and food; Faulkner and translation; Faulkner and the gay world; Faulkner and consumer culture; Faulkner and film; Faulkner as cultural artifact.

Katie presented the treasurer's report: the balance in the society's account as of May 4 was $2,166.63.

Jack reminded those at the meeting of the deadline for nomination of students for the society's Hunt scholarship to the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference.  Because The Faulkner Journal had made an extra-large payment to this fund to cover 2004's scholarship winner, they made no contribution last year.  Jack said he would get in touch with Dawn Trouard to see about the journal's contribution for this year's scholarship.

There was considerable discussion about the issue of how to handle members whose dues payments were in arrears.  Katie indicated that currently the treasurer/secretary sends a general reminder for dues payments with the fall newsletter.  There was some discussion as to whether a more targeted reminder was in order, with a letter going out over the president's signature only to those members in arrears.  Barbara suggested that such a letter should indicate the benefits of WFS membership.  This led to a discussion of ways to further develop those benefits.  Suggestions included the creation of a password-protected part of the WFS website that would contain conference papers, the newsletter, and the membership list.  All agreed that members should be encouraged to renew their memberships in multiple year increments.

Jack suggested that it was probably time for the society to move to an electronic-only mode of circulating the newsletter.  Katie agreed and noted that currently a little fewer than 50 members have not supplied an e-mail address.  Perhaps the next issue of the newsletter should go out by post to those members with a notice that this will be the last newsletter distributed in hard copy, and urging those members to supply us with an e-mail address.

The WFS website is currently housed at the University of Mississippi (along with Jay Watson, the new vice-president).  Jack reported that he has already been in touch with the IT people at OleMiss and been given access to the site.  Anne asked whether we wanted to investigate the possibility of setting up a chatroom or a listserv.  Katie noted that the Narrative listserv currently has a good deal of difficulty keeping out cranks and spammers.  Anne noted the excellent standard set by the listservs overseen by H-Net at Michigan State University.

The meeting was adjourned shortly after 3 p.m.      

Minutes prepared by Catherine Gunther Kodat, former Secretary-Treasurer

Calendar of Events, Deadlines, and Notification Dates

January 1: Calendar year membership dues

January 15: Deadline for submission to WFS of proposals for American Literature Association sessions

March 1: Deadline for submission to WFS of proposals for Modern Language Association sessions 

March 15: Deadline for Hunt/Faulkner Journal nominations for scholarships to Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha Conference

March 30: Notification of Hunt scholars

Early April: Spring Newsletter

April 1: MLA deadline for program copy for affiliate organizations

April 7: MLA deadline for panel participants to join MLA

May 24-27: ALA Conference (2 panels, scheduled business meeting)

July 27-30: Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha Conference

September: Fall Newsletter;

October: Calls for Papers posted U Penn website, ALA website

December 27-30: MLA Conference (2 sessions, non-program business meeting)