Upcoming Events and CFPs
January 3-6, 2019
MLA Convention: Faulkner and World War I
May 23-26, 2019
ALA Conference: Topic TBA
July 21-25, 2019
Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha: Annual conference of Faulkner scholars in Oxford, Mississippi, sponsored by the University of Mississippi
Past Events
May 31, 2018
Faulkner Studies in the UK: A Colloquium, Senate House, London

Keynote speaker: Professor Tim Armstrong, Royal Holloway, University of London

Author of The Logic of Slavery: Debt, Technology, and Pain in American Literature

This colloquium is the first of a series of events intended to found a Faulkner Studies in the UK Research Network, hosted by the Department of English at Royal Holloway, and in association with the British Association for American Studies (BAAS) and the US Embassy, London. The Network serves as a key counterpoint to the abundant focus on American modernist author William Faulkner in the United States; it formalises an upsurge in critical material on Faulkner and the growing interest in Southern Studies in recent years among UK scholars.

Modern Language Association 2018
William Faulkner’s New York

Presiding: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State Univ.

  1. Faulkner’s Puppet Worlds, from New York to Yoknapatawpha, Mary A. Knighton, Aoyama Gakuin U
  2. The South’s Outer Limits: Staging The Sound and the Fury, Julie Napolin, New School
  3. One Fifth Avenue: William Faulkner Romances Manhattan . . . and Joan Williams, Lisa Catherine Hickman, Independent Scholar
American Literature Association 2017
Reading Faulkner in the Age of Trump(ism)

Chair: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State University

  1. “Snopes, Trump, and the Populist Modern,” Benjamin Child, Colgate University
  2. “‘He Could Do So Much More’: Faulkner’s Lessons about Abortion for Trump’s America," Eden Wales Freedman, Mount Mercy University
Faulkner and the Position of the Public Intellectual: A Roundtable

Moderator: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State University

  1. “An American Scholar: Faulkner, The Paris Review and Ralph Waldo Emerson,” James Hussey, Trinity College Dublin
  2. “Prizing the Public Intellectual: William Faulkner’s Literary Legacy,” Laura Wright, Univ. of Connecticut
  3. “William Faulkner at Nagano in Context: American Studies as Cultural Diplomacy during the Cold War,” Deborah Cohn, Indiana Univ.
  4. “Genre/Race/Region: Faulkner's Private and Public Pinioning," Peter Lurie, Univ.of Richmond
  5. “Playing the Worldly Mississippian: Faulkner on Omnibus,” Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State Univ.
Modern Language Association 2017
Faulkner and World Literature

Presiding: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State Univ.

  1. "Pauk and Faulkner on Writing Global Literary History," Benjamin Mangrum, Davidson Coll.
  2. "The Apocryphal and the Parochial, from Yoknapatawpha to Maqiao: William Faulkner and Chinese 'Roots-Seeking Literature,'" Kate Costello, Univ. of Oxford, St. Hugh's Coll.
  3. "William Faulkner in Iceland," Haukur Ingvarsson, Univ. of Iceland
American Literature Association 2016
Performing Faulkner

Chair: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State University

  1. The Reivers: Race and Reminiscence,” Michael Kreyling, Vanderbilt University
  2. "Very Like a Spyglass: Second Sight as Childish Vision in As I Lay Dying," Hayley O’Malley, University of Michigan
  3. “Howard Hawks and the Screwball Comedy in William Faulkner’s The Wild Palms (If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem),” Sarah Leventer, Boston University
Textured Relations: Faulkner and the World of Cotton

Chair: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State University

  1. “Minding the Store,” David A. Davis, Mercer University
  2. “Forms of Resistance: Cotton and Rubber in Faulkner’s ‘The Last Slaver,’” James Harding, University of Exeter
  3. “From Hundred to Harvard: Faulkner and the Laboring Intellectual,” Addison Palacios, University of California, Riverside
Modern Language Association 2016
Posthuman Possibilities in Faulkner
  1. "Composted Humans: Faulkner's Trilogy and 'Jonquil Thunder,'" Candace J. Waid, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  2. "Technologies of Writing and History: Pylon, Absalom, Absalom!, and Posthumanism," Peter Lurie, Univ. of Richmond
  3. "Neither Water nor Earth: The Yellow Pine in As I Lay Dying," Andrew Kalaidjian, William Paterson Univ.
American Literature Association 2015
Faulkner and the North

Chair: Deborah Clarke, Arizona State University

  1. “Mobile Subjects in Faulkner, Larsen, and Thurman: The Journey North and the Lure of Belonging,” Cheryl Lester, University of Kansas
  2. “On Malcolm Cowley’s Yoknapatawpha County,” Carolina Alvarado, Princeton University
  3. “‘… and they will bleach out again’: The Influence of Canada on Faulkner’s Fiction,” William M. Teem IV, Georgia Northwestern Technical College
Faulkner and the Nineteenth Century

Chair: Ted Atkinson, Mississippi State University

  1. “Crossing Genres and Genders: The Voice of the Dead in Dickinson and Faulkner,” Erin Penner, Asbury University
  2. “The Colonized American Imperialist in Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop and Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!,” John Gallagher, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  3. “Exploring the Boundaries of Narrative: Faulkner’s Imaginary War,” Adam Jabbur, Towson University
Modern Language Association 2014
382. Faulkner and Disability Studies

Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Los Angeles–Miami, Chicago Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Ted B. Atkinson, Mississippi State Univ.

  1. "Engaging the Poetics of Disability in Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury: Benjy's Epistemological Critique of the South," Erin E. Eighan, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs
  2. "Sound and the Fury as a Prosthetic Text: Faulkner, Modernism, and Disability Studies," Sandra K. Stanley, California State Univ., Northridge
  3. "'Two Phlegm-Clots above Her': Prosthesis and Disability in Sanctuary," Taylor Hagood, Florida Atlantic Univ.

Responding: Michael Bérubé, Penn State Univ., University Park

760. Faulkner and Women Writers

Sunday, 12 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Old Town, Chicago Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Deborah L. Clarke, Arizona State Univ.

  1. "'Coldly Intense Writers': William Faulkner, Djuna Barnes, and Social Margins," Kelly C. MacPhail, McGill Univ.
  2. "Huntin' Bar with Marge and Will; or, William Faulkner and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Write Wilderness," John Wharton Lowe, Univ. of Georgia
  3. "Faulkner and Female Narrators," Jolene Hubbs, Univ. of Alabama,Tuscaloosa
American Literature Association 2012
Session 12-B Faulknerian Objects (Pacific F)

Friday, May 25, 2012 3:40 – 5:00 pm

Organized by the William Faulkner Society

Chair: Jay Watson, University of Mississippi

  1. “Commodifying Freedom: Horses in The Hamlet,” Lance Langdon, University of California, Irvine
  2. “Elegy, Effigy: Alchemy and the Displacement of Lament in As I Lay Dying,” Libby Martin, University of California, Irvine
  3. “The Eyes Have It: Colorizing The Sound and the Fury,” Stephen Ross, National Endowment for the Humanities
Session 20-I Comparative Approaches to Faulkner and Fitzgerald (Pacific K)

Saturday, May 26, 2012 3:40 – 5:00 pm

Organized by the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society and the William Faulkner Society

Chair: Peter Alan Froehlich, Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton

  1. “Gothic Temporalities and Spectral Identities in The Great Gatsby and Absalom, Absalom!,” Taryn Norman, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  2. “‘A man can think better on salary’: the Commodification of the Human in the Hollywood Short Stories of Faulkner and Fitzgerald,” Ben Robbins, Free University of Berlin
  3. “Or Does it Explode? The American Dream after the Bomb,” Laura Goldblatt, University of Virginia
Modern Language Association 2011
Session 450. Digital Faulkner: William Faulkner and Digital Humanities

Saturday, 7 January 2012

10:15–11:30 a.m., 615, Washington State Convention Center

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Steven Knepper, Univ. of Virginia

Speakers: Keith Goldsmith, Knopf; John B. Padgett, Brevard Coll.; Stephen Railton, Univ. of Virginia; Peter Stoicheff, Univ. of Saskatchewan

A roundtable on digital humanities and its implications for teaching and scholarship on the work of William Faulkner.

Session 543. Conrad and Faulkner: Revisiting the Modern

Saturday, 7 January 2012

3:30–4:45 p.m., 607, Washington State Convention Center

Program arranged by the Joseph Conrad Society of America and the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Christopher GoGwilt, Fordham Univ., Bronx

  1. "'O Brother Where Art Thou?': Conrad and Faulkner's Circumatlantic Locations," Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
  2. "Unsettling Voices and Social Critique in Light in August and Nostromo," Marta Puxan, Pompeu Fabra Univ., Barcelona
  3. “‘Through his Lips from the Past’: Narrative Resonance in Absalom, Absalom! and Lord Jim,” Julie Napolin, Univ. of California, Berkeley
American Literature Association 2011
Session 10-E Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! at 75: Reflections and Reassessments

Friday, May 27, 2011

12:40 –2:00 pm

A Roundtable organized by the William Faulkner Society

Chair: Jay Watson, University of Mississippi

Panelists:

  1. Michael P. Bibler, University of Manchester
  2. Doreen Fowler, University of Kansas
  3. Catherine Gunther Kodat, Hamilton College
  4. John Padgett, Brevard College
  5. Robert Dale Parker, University of Illinois
  6. Philip M. Weinstein, Swarthmore College
Session 11-O Business Meeting: Faulkner Society

Friday, May 27, 2011

2:10 – 3:30 pm

Session 19-E Cather and Faulkner: Critical Intersections I: Modern Transformations

Saturday, May 28, 2011

2:00 – 3:20 pm

Organized by the Willa Cather Foundation and the William Faulkner Society

Chair: John Swift, Occidental College

  1. "Horror and Outrage: Gothic Masculinities in Absalom, Absalom! and The Song of the Lark," Michelle E. Moore, College of DuPage
  2. "Cosmological Affinities: Cather, Faulkner, and Einstein," Elizabeth Cornell, Fordham University
  3. "Interlocking Games in Cather and Faulkner," Sarah Clere, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Session 20-E Cather and Faulkner: Critical Intersections II: Interrogating Narratives of Nationhood

Saturday, May 28, 2011

3:30 – 4:50 pm

Organized by the Willa Cather Foundation and the William Faulkner Society

Chair: Jay Watson, University of Mississippi

  1. "Uneasy Assembly: Home and History in The Professor's House and Absalom, Absalom!," Camilla Perri Ammirati, University of Virginia
  2. "Faulkner's Doom and Cather's Eve: Native Americans, Capitalism, and Ambivalence," Melanie Benson Taylor, Dartmouth College
  3. “Historical Resurrections and Prophesies of Empire in Death Comes for the Archbishop and Absalom, Absalom!,” Ryan Heryford, University of California San Diego

[N.B. The Cather/Faulkner sessions (19-E and 20-E) have been scheduled consecutively, and will be held in the same room, in order to function as a mini-symposium on the two writers.]

Modern Language Association 2010
117. The Faulkner-Oprah File: A Roundtable on the Summer of Faulkner

3:30–4:45 p.m., Thursday, January 6

Diamond Salon 2, J. W. Marriott

Presiding: Jaime Harker, Univ. of Mississippi

Speakers: Thadious M. Davis, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Robert Hamblin, Southeast Missouri State Univ.; Cecilia Konchar Farr, Saint Catherine’s Women’s Coll., Riche Richardson, Cornell Univ.

This panel uses the five-year anniversary of Oprah’s summer of Faulkner to consider its larger literary and cultural implications. For many, this alliance between Oprah and Faulkner was unlikely, if not treacherous, pop culture schlock merged with modernist complexity and profundity. The panel gsuggests, however, that the summer of Faulkner complicates such simple binaries, suggesting the long interdependence of highbrow writers, the literary marketplace, and popular culture.

563. Imagining the Animal in Faulkner

1:45–3:00 p.m., Saturday, January 6

Platinum Salon I, J. W. Marriott

Presiding: Judson D. Watson, Univ. of Mississippi

“The Book of Which Those Others Were but Foals: The Personal, the Aesthetic, and the Mammalian in Flags in the Dust,” Kristin Fujie, Univ. of California, Berkeley

“The Buzzard Reality of As I Lay Dying,” Sandra K. Stanley, California State Univ., Northridge

“Lion in the Garden: Paradox and the Question of the Posthuman in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses,” Bart H. Welling, Univ. of North Florida

American Literature Association 2010
Session 8-I Faulkner and the Uses of Philosophy

Friday, May 28, 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Chair: Jay Watson, University of Mississippi

“Conspiracy as Philosophy,” Joost Burgers, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

“Faulkner, Anti-Bergsonian,” James Harker, University of California, Berkeley

“The Necessary Hospitality of Light in August," Sharon Desmond Paradiso, Endicott College

Session 11-F Legacies of Encounter in Faulkner

Friday, May 28, 2:00-3:20 p.m.

Chair: Deborah Clarke, Arizona State University

“When Red Leaves: The Semiotics of Vanishing in William Faulkner’s Representations of ‘Indians,’” Sandra Cox, University of Kansas

‘Whiskey in the Sand: Bootlegging Alienation in Light in August,” Scott E. Moore, Brandeis University

“Rethinking the ‘Never-Never’: William Faulkner, Africa, and A Fable," Gary Rees, University of Houston

Session 12-L Business Meeting: Faulkner Society

Friday, May 28, 3:30-4:50 p.m.

Modern Language Association 2009
Faulkner in the 1950s

10:15-11:30 a.m. December 29 in Grand Ballroom Salon J, Philadelphia Marriott

Moderator: Catherine Gunther Kodat, Professor of English, Hamilton College

Caroline Miles, Assistant Professor of English, University of Texas-Pan American, “Faulkner, the 1950s, and the Blue-Collar South”

Joseph Urgo, Professor of English and Dean of Faculty, Hamilton College, “Faulkner's Pedagogy”

Michael Zeitlin, Associate Professor of English, University of British Columbia, "Faulkner and the Crash of the Italian Airliner, December 18, 1954"

Faulkner and the Environment

12:00 noon-1:15 p.m. December 30 in Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott

Moderator: Jay Watson, Professor of English, University of Mississippi; President, The William Faulkner Society

Stefan Solomon, Doctoral Candidate in English, University of New South Wales, “By the Rivers of Babylon: Faulkner’s Apocryphal Environment”

Michael Beilfuss, Doctoral Candidate in English, Texas A&M University, “'Use It Well': Progress, Reciprocal Ownership, and the Environment in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses

Bart H. Welling, Associate Professor of English, University of North Florida, “Green Faulkner or Go Down, Moses ‘Lite’? Revisualizing Wilderness in Big Woods”

South Atlantic Modern Language Association 2009
The Scrutiny of the Public Eye in the Work of William Faulkner

Panel Presented in Affiliation with the William Faulkner Society

Saturday 2:45 to 4:15 pm Georgia Ballroom East

Chair: Victoria Bryan, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Randall Wilhelm, University of Tennessee, "Framing Difference: Frames and Boundaries in Faulkner’s Fiction"

Rachel Walsh, Stony Brook University, "On Not Uttering Justice: Scenes of Public Mourning and Punishment in Faulkner"

Major Scott Chancellor, University of Mississippi, "Faulkner’s Word and Word in Conflict"

American Literature Association 2009
Topics in Faulkner Studies [Session 12-A]

Friday, May 22 3:30-4:50 p.m.

Organized by the William Faulkner Society

Chair: Jay Watson, University of Mississippi

  1. “The Sense of the Middest in William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury,” Benjamin D. Hagen, University of Rhode Island
  2. “Conceptions of Modernity: Reproductive Rights and Incorporated Rhetoric in As I Lay Dying,” Heather Holcombe, Boston University
  3. “Yoknapatawpha's Viewers: Whiteness, Class, and Early Cinema in Faulkner's South,” Peter Lurie, University of Richmond
Busines Meeting: Faulkner Society [Session 14-L]

Friday, May 22 5:00-6:20 p.m.

Faulkner and the Metropolis [Session 16-C]

Organized by the William Faulkner Society

Chair: Peter Lurie, University of Richmond

  1. “The City Specter: William Faulkner and the Threat of Urban Encroachment,” Anne Hirsch Moffitt, Princeton University
  2. "From Kinston to Beale Street: Sounding the Black Metropolis in Faulkner's Sanctuary,” Cheryl Lester, University of Kansas
  3. “Faulkner’s Paris: The City Under Siege,” Barbara Ladd, Emory University
Modern Language Association 2008
41. Faulkner and Modernist Studies

3:30–4:45 p.m., Hilton San Francisco

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Peter Lurie, Univ. of Richmond

  1. “Faulkner and Modern Criticism: Southern Literature and the Modernist Institutionalization of ‘Difficulty,’” Florence Dore, Kent State Univ., Kent
  2. “William Faulkner’s Rural Modernism,” Jolene Hubbs, Stanford Univ.
  3. “‘I Look Just like a Kodak Negative’: Callie, Maud, and the Origins of Faulkner’s Racialized Visual Poetics,” Judith L. Sensibar, Arizona State Univ. West

For copies of abstracts, visit faulknersociety.com after 10 Dec.

290. Why Faulkner Now?

1:45–3:00 p.m., Hilton San Francisco

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: John T. Matthews, Boston Univ.

Speakers: Hosam Mohamed Aboul-Ela, Univ. of Houston, University Park; Deborah Cohn, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Richard Godden, Univ. of California, Irvine; Barbara Ladd, Emory Univ.; Harilaos Stecopoulos, Univ. of Iowa

For copies of abstracts, visit faulknersociety.com after 10 Dec.

Modern Language Association 2007
Faulkner and World Cinema

Session sponsored by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Peter Lurie, University of Richmond

  1. 'Do you know William Faulkner?' 'No, who's he? Have you slept with him?'": Faulkner, Téchiné and Post-New Wave French Cinema," D. Matthew Ramsey, Salve Regina University
  2. "Faulkner in the Light of Mexican Cinema," Jerry W. Carlson, The City College & The Graduate Center (CUNY)
  3. 'If It Still is France, It Will Endure': Faulknerian Projections from Hollywood to Stockholm ," Robert A. Jackson, University of Virginia
William Faulkner: Voices from Beyond the United States

Session sponsored by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Barbara Ladd, Emory University

  1. “Southern Time: Transnationalism and Temporality in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!,” David Watson, Uppsala University
  2. “Faulkner, Фолкнер Folkner, Fokner: A Case-study of Slavic-Anglophone Translatability,” Sanja Bahun, University of Sheffield
  3. “William Faulkner and the Romanian Readership: A Criticism of Survival,” Ana-Karina Schneider, Lucian Blaga University
American Literature Association 2007
Session 4-I New Directions in Faulkner Scholarship

Thursday, May 24, 2007

1:00 – 2:20pm

Organized by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Doreen Fowler, University of Kansas

  1. “Race-ing Toward Manhood in Intruder in the Dust,” Charmaine Eddy, Trent University
  2. “Extremities of the Body: The Anoptic Corporeality of As I Lay Dying,” Erin E. Edwards, University of California, Berkeley
  3. “Magazine Culture, American Modernism, and Faulkner’s Aesthete,” Lucas Tromly, University of Manitoba
Session 8-D The Space(s) of Faulkner’s Pylon: Politics, Economics, Culture

Friday, May 25, 2007

8:00-9:20 am

Organized by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Peter Lurie, University of Richmond

  1. “‘They Aint Human Like Us’: Compromised Bodies and Spatiality in Pylon,” Taylor Hagood, Florida Atlantic University
  2. “Pylon and the Rise of Fascism,” Michael Zeitlin, University of British Columbia
  3. “‘Flying Low’: Faulkner and Pylon in the Pulp Milieu,” David M. Earle, Case Western Reserve University
Session 9-M: Business Meeting: William Faulkner Society

9:30 – 10:50 am

Modern Language Association 2006
471. Faulkner: Reading under Representation

Friday, 29 December

1:45–3:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon L, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: John T. Matthews, Boston Univ.

  1. “Performing ‘The South’ in the Canadian Imaginary: Shreve McCannon, Marshall McLuhan, and the Southern Pastoral,” Jade Ferguson, Cornell Univ.
  2. “Absence as a Formal Equivalent of Psychic Trauma in Requiem for a Nun,” Dorothy R. Stringer, James Madison Univ.
  3. Absalom, Absalom! and Light in August: History, Fiction, and Politics of Traumatic Form,” Greg Forter, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia
  4. “Faulkner’s Literary Historiography: Color, Photography, and the Accessible Past,” Peter Green Lurie, Univ. of Richmond
691. Faulkner, Regionalism, and Modernism

Saturday, 30 December

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 404, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Anne Goodwyn Jones, Univ. of Mississippi

  1. “The Modernist Death of Donald Mahon,” David A. Davis, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  2. “The Western and the Southern: Faulkner, Genre, and the Crisis of Modernity,” Robert A. Jackson, Univ. of Virginia
  3. “The Unconscious and Its Environs,” Leigh Anne Duck, Univ. of Memphis

Respondent: Barbara Ladd, Emory Univ.

American Literature Association 2006
Session 10-G Slow Reading Faulkner

Friday, May 26, 2006

(Pacific Concourse G) 11:00am – 12:20am

Presiding: John T. Matthews, Boston University

  1. Deborah Clarke, Penn State University
  2. Martin Kreiswirth, University of Western Ontario

And now,” Shreve said, “we’re going to talk about love.” But he didn’t need to say that either, any more than he had needed to specify which he he meant by he, since neither of them had been thinking about anything else; all that had gone before just so much that had to be overpassed and none else present to overpass it but them, as someone always has to rake the leaves up before you can have the bonfire. That was why it did not matter to either of them which one did the talking, since it was not the talking alone which did it, performed and accomplished the overpassing, but some happy marriage of speaking and hearing wherein each before the demand, the requirement, forgave condoned and forgot the faulting of the other—faultings both in the creating of this shade whom they discussed (rather, existed in) and in the hearing and sifting and discarding the false and conserving what seemed true, or fit the preconceived—in order to overpass to love, where there might be paradox and inconsistency but nothing fault nor false. “And now, love. . . .

Absalom, Absalom!: The Corrected Text (Vintage, 1990), p. 253
Session 19-G The Politics of Faulknerian Form

Saturday, May 27, 2006

(Pacific Concourse G) 12:30pm – 1:50pm

Presiding: Anne Goodwyn Jones, Mississippi University for Women

  1. “‘In and Of Itself’: Faulkner’s Mules and Southern Singularity,” Cynthia Dobbs, University of the Pacific
  2. “‘Go Slow, Now’: Faulkner, Gavin Stevens and the Rhetoric of Race,” Doreen Fowler, University of Kansas
  3. “Appalachian Stereotypes and Southern Discomfort: Narrating Ideological Conflicts through the Sutpen Saga,” Jessica Chainer Nowacki, Duquesne University.
Modern Language Association 2005
366. Queering Faulkner

Thursday, 29 December

8:30–9:45 a.m., Carolina, Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Catherine Gunther Kodat, Hamilton College

  1. “‘Why Are You So Black?’: Faulkner’s Whiteface Minstrels, Primitivism, and Perversion,” John N. Duvall, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette
  2. “Absalom, Absalom! as Queer Christian Conversion Narrative,” Norman Waters Jones, Ohio State Univ., Mansfield
  3. “How Shreve Gets in to Quentin’s Pants,” Noel Earl Polk, Mississippi State Univ.
  4. “‘All That Glitters’: Reappraising ‘Golden Land,’” D. Matthew Ramsey, Denison Univ.

Respondent: Anne G. Jones, Univ. of Mississippi

Friday, 30 December

765. Faulkner and the Global South

1:45–3:00 p.m., Marriott Balcony B, Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Evelyn Jaffe Schreiber, George Washington University

  1. “From Revolutionary through Cold War: The Russian Outlanders of Faulkner’s South,” Randy S. Boyagoda, Univ. of Notre Dame
  2. “Faulkner and Three Women of the Hispanic Caribbean,” Jerry Wayne Carlson, City Coll., City Univ. of New York
  3. “Combating Anti-Americanism during the Cold War: Faulkner, the State Department, and Latin America,” Deborah Cohn, Indiana Univ., Bloomington
  4. “Literature, the Market, and the Sanctuary Imperative: Toward an Alternative Genealogy of the Narrative of Faulkner in Latin America,” Sarah Ann Wells, Univ. of California, Berkeley

Respondent: John T. Matthews, Boston Univ.

American Literature Association 2005
Session 14-B: Slow Reading Faulkner

Chair: Anne Goodwyn Jones, University of Missouri at Rolla

Each speaker will offer a close reading of a single Faulkner passage chosen by the executive board. The passage chosen is from The Sound and the Fury and appears in Quentin's section (Norton pp. 94-104 and Vintage pp. 186-203). It represents Quentin's uninterrupted memory/imagination of the scene with Caddy at the stream and the fight with Dalton Ames, beginning with "one minute she was standing there the next he was yelling . . . ." and ending with "her blood surged steadily beating and beating against my hand." This passage appears between two scenes late in the section: the "trial" for Quentin's involvement with the little Italian girl and, after the fight with Gerald Bland, Shreve's efforts to help Quentin clean up his blood at the pump. The link provides a bit of the text preceding and following the marked passage as well as the passage itself.

  1. Richard Godden, University of Sussex, U. K
  2. Candace Waid, University of California at Santa Barbara
  3. Philip Weinstein, Swarthmore College

Respondent: Anne Goodwyn Jones, University of Missouri at Rolla

Session 17-F: Faulkner and the Cold War

Saturday, May 28

Chair: John T. Matthews, Boston University

  1. "A Quest for Peace: Faulkner's A Fable,” John B. Padgett, Brevard College
  2. "`Another Country, Another Front': Race, Transnationalism, and the Cold War in A Fable,” Laura G. Yow, Vassar College
  3. "After 50 Years: William Faulkner in Japan in 1955 and the Significance of his Presence in the Cold War Context,” Yuji Kato, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
  4. "'Two sisters in sin swapping trade secrets over Coca-Colas in the quiet kitchen': Cold War Containment in Faulkner's Requiem for a Nun,” Tim Caron, California State University, Long Beach
  5. "Not 'an American first--he could be an artist first': Faulkner, the Individual Artist Versus the Public Man,” William Moss, Wake Forest University

Respondent: John T. Matthews, Boston University

Modern Language Association 2004
411. Faulkner and the 1930s

Wednesday, 29 December

10:15–11:30 a.m., Independence Ballroom Salon II, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: John T. Matthews, Boston Univ.

  1. “‘It Ain’t on a Balance’: As I Lay Dying and the Cultural Politics of the Great Depression,” Ted B. Atkinson, Augusta State Univ.
  2. “‘My Son, My Son!’: Paternalism, Haiti, and Early-Twentieth-Century American Imperialism in Absalom, Absalom!, Sara Elizabeth Gerend, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  3. “The Poetics of an Economic Transition: A Laborious Reading of ‘The Fire and the Hearth,’” Richard Henry Godden, Univ. of Sussex

Respondent: John T. Matthews Response to "Faulkner and the 1930s"

688. Fifty Years after A Fable

Thursday, 30 December

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 410, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the William Faulkner Society

Presiding: Joseph R. Urgo, Univ. of Mississippi

  1. “Politics and Art: Faulkner’s A Fable,” Keen Butterworth, Univ. of South Carolina
  2. A Fable of the Cold War,” David A. Davis, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  3. “Faulkner’s Unread Labor Novel: Displaced Class War and the Heroic Worker in A Fable,” Caroline Miles, Thomas Univ.
  4. “Fifty Years after A Fable,” Noel Earl Polk, Mississippi State Univ.
  5. “Christ and Tracer Fire / Allegory and Attitude: A Speculative Reading of A Fable,” Theresa M. Towner, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

Respondent: Joseph R. Urgo Response to “Fifty Years After A Fable”